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Can Civility Become a Competitive Advantage?

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Empowerment
Can Civility Become a Competitive Advantage?

What happened to civility? When did we lose it? Did we ever have it? How can we find it and successfully implement civility for the common good? There is no denying we live in a divided country. Strong opinions, harsh words, misrepresentation of facts, and outright lies have become commonplace. Civil discourse, discussion and debate has been replaced with name calling, hostile rhetoric and at times acts of violence.

The lack of civility is not limited to the political area. We see it every day in business. People are disengaged at work. Per a recent Gallup report, two-thirds of American workers are unhappy with their jobs and 15 percent actually hate their work. If my math is correct, that means 81 percent of workers do not enjoy their job and are not engaged toward working toward a common ground. This is a staggering number and brings with it serious problems such as: declining productivity, revenue and profit margins suffer, employee turnover increases, corporate sabotage rises, legal actions by customers and employees. Negative undergrounds, and worse yet, battle grounds, develop and gain traction.

Companies that suffer from departmental rivalries (lack of civility or common ground) are 5.82 times more likely to have systemic problems with honesty, according to a 15-year study conducted by consultant Ron Carucci. And widespread issues with honesty can pave the way to the kind of scandals that rocked Wells Fargo and Volkswagen in recent years.

While things will never be perfect, an improvement in civility can give companies a competitive edge. How do we get back to civility? While fear is the enemy of civility, education is the key to overcoming fear. The more we know about people, cultures, background, religions, races, etc., the better the chances for civil discourse.

Let’s break this down to the most basic component. Civility requires people to find a common ground to discuss, review and make decisions that affect the overall good of an organization. People are women and men. Each sees the world through very different lens. There are dozens of books that attempt to explain how men and women address nearly every imaginable issue. Let’s step back and look at some of the issues and challenges that have faced men and women over time.

Women’s issues go back to the cavemen days. The need to survive made the physically strongest individual the undisputed leader. Women were cast into subservient or secondary roles. As we left the caves there were more challenges to overcome:

  • The right to own property
  • The right to vote
  • Women’s roles, no working outside of the house
  • Entering the workforce challenges
  • Entering college
  • Wage Gap
  • Glass ceiling

Men’s issues can also be traced to the cavemen days. Since men are physically stronger, they held the position of power and privilege. Those aspects of perceived power and privilege continued for centuries which reinforced aggression, emotionlessness and other negative qualities, theorized as a component of masculine ideology, particularly in the United States. It is often validated by the statement “boys will be boys.” Adherence to traditional male gender roles restrict the kinds of emotions allowable for boys and men to express, including social expectations that men seek to be dominant (the “alpha male”) and limit their emotional range primarily to expressions of anger. Men continued to hold the positions of power and privilege.

As we entered the 1960s and 70s, things radically changed. More women started entering the workforce often out of economic necessity. They were putting off marriage. Women had more choices. More and more women graduated from college and were capable of supporting themselves. They didn’t need a man to be the sole provider and protector. In many cases they didn’t need a man at all.

Women were no longer willing to hold secondary roles. They were starting businesses; being elected to public office. After the 2018 election, 127 women serve in congress. 25 women (25%) serve in the U.S. Senate, and 102 women (23.4%) serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. In 2020 women outnumber men in college, in grad schools, and in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) programs.

In the workplace, men and women issues only touch the surface. Now added to gender are the complexities of race, religion, sexual orientation, and more recently political persuasion issues. Cliques, splinter groups, and alliances start to form between those who feel left out or shut out versus those perceived to have the privileged and power. In this underground, these groups prepare for battle. One of the battles is to turn to the courts or legislation.

Each group feels they are disadvantaged or do not hold the position of privilege or power. Unfortunately, life and the world are not fair. Those who have don’t want to give it up. They feel they have earned their power and position of privilege. While the have nots claim discrimination and seek the law to “help level the playing field.” Strong social movements have led to laws whose intent were to create a “more equitable” environment going back to issue of slavery. They look to legislation for relief.

Since 1963, no less than 11 laws passed whose intent is to level the playing field against discrimination. While legislation does provide some relief, it is not a panacea. Rather, legislation provides guidelines. These guidelines produced countless regulations and mandatory compliance training. So on top of everything else business leader have to do—we now have to develop and address compliance training.

On or about 1969, in an effort to address the successful implementation of the laws, new regulations were mandated and we started the era of “mandatory compliance training.” Compliance training was often met with disdain. “Another compliance class! We don’t have time for this! These are a complete a total waste of time!”

So how successful has 56 years of mandatory compliance training been in bringing civility to the workplace? While there has been some progress, the underground is still alive and well. For example, Tamara Burke started a movement she called “Me Too” in 2006. It exploded into #METOO in 2017. Powerful, privileged people, such as Harvey Weinstein, Senator Al Franken, and TV personality Charlie Rose, lost their jobs, careers, and fortunes.

There is a renewed effort to pass the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). We have daily political scandals and investigations. Old wounds are reopened and battle lines are drawn again.

Opportunities for Growth

While the majority of victims from the #METOO movement have been men, Meryl Streep’s character in the movie The Devil Wears Prada, shows us uncivil behavior is not just a masculine trait. On the positive note, the #METOO movement gives us the opportunity to discuss, explore, and address other toxins that harm both people and businesses such as:

  • Bullying
  • Intimidation
  • Retaliation
  • Closed minds
  • Friction between employee age groups

That is how we got to where we are today. Now what? How do we return to civility? We ask the hard questions.

  • How do we improve the workplace?
  • What to you enjoy about working here?
  • What goals are you trying to accomplish?
  • Finding a common ground – a point of agreement to begin
  • Agreement on the common ground creates a basis for progress

The first step is to understand the dynamics at play. My associate, Marc Porter Ph.D., research contents that every organization has three distinct environments.

  • Common ground
  • Underground
  • Battleground

What is the common ground?

In order to build a common ground there must be trust. With this trust comes the understanding that:

  • Conflict & debate have value and are constructive.
  • Confrontation and conflict in and of themselves are not toxic.
  • Productive conflict pools people and ideas toward the common goal.
  • Open dialogue
  • Conversation, debate, compromise, mutually agreed courses of action

What is the Underground?

The less people understand how their hard work adds value to bigger goals, the less engaged they are. It becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy of failure and frustration. – Brene Brown – Dare to Lead. This creates the underground.

  • Lack of trust
  • Festering & silence – sit on the sidelines and wait for failure.
  • Win/lose mindset
  • Parties come into dialogue with closed minds.
  • Confrontation must be defeated.
  • Personal attacks

What is the battle ground?

When confrontation/competition attacks the value of a person the battle ground is created:

  • Negative cliques and alliances develop
  • Labeling (villain, victim, there is nothing I can do)
  • Planning mass exodus
  • Misuse of confidential information
  • Water cooler and at bar dialogues dominate opinions
  • Getting ready for battle—sabotage, passive resistance, legal action, etc.

Where do you stand as an organization?

Per Gallup, two-thirds of workers are unhappy with their jobs and 15 percent actually hate their work. 81% of people are NOT in the common ground. Your organization is or will soon be dysfunctional. The challenge is how do you move from underground and battle ground to common ground.

Four Key Components to Establish Common Ground

In the bestselling book Crucial Conversations, the author’s research states that “People will believe you are working toward a common ground in the workplace, when leadership shows they care about their goals, interest, and value.” – Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler – Crucial Conversations

  1. Are we connected?
  2. Do we have a future?
  3. Do we care about each other’s goals, interests, and value?
  4. Is there trust?

Challenges to Common Ground?

The illusion of technique. Far too many managers ask the wrong questions which misplaces their focus. They become fixated with constantly changing the process or procedures. This is too often a knee jerk reaction, which is similar to a farmer constantly re-plowing the same field every day. Rather than focusing on changing the techniques consider changing the dialogue.

  • Misplaced focus.
  • Constant changing of processes and procedures.
  • Change for the sake of change.
  • Throw multiple theories against the wall.
  • Trying for the quick fix – “Give me pill to cure this.”

Getting to Common Ground

High performing cultures are more than a great product or design or strategy. They have developed a safe environment. It has less to do with design than with connecting to deeper emotions: fear, ambition, and motivation. The real power of a successful interaction is located in the two-way emotional signaling that creates an atmosphere of connection that surrounds the conversation. – Daniel Coyle – The Culture Code

Something to consider: Words matter. How we think and talk about ourselves affects our self-image. Once we change our “self-talk,” we will be better able to interact positively with others. – Don Miguel Ruiz – The Four Agreements

  • Building the groundwork – There is no quick cure.
  • Like building a garden – it is going to take time and effort.
  • You are going to get dirty.
  • It is hard work.
  • It is constant attention and nurturing.

Civility as a Competitive Advantage

One misconception about highly successful cultures is that they are happy, lighthearted places. This is mostly NOT the case. They are energized and engaged, but at their core their members are oriented less around achieving happiness than around solving hard problems together. – Daniel Coyle – The Culture Code

The pool of shared meaning is the birthplace of synergy. Not only does a share pool help individuals make better choices, but since the meaning is shared, people willingly act on whatever decision they make with both unity and conviction. – Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler – Crucial Conversations

When you create an environment where people are energized and engaged, where they feel their ideas and input are valued, you will have the common ground where the civility within your organization will lead you to unprecedented success.

Call us, we’ll help you.

Know your Self Interest, Then Shape Your World By Dr. Kas Henry

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Empowerment
Know your Self Interest, Then Shape Your World By Dr. Kas Henry

The life we sustain by our choices are our own. This is nowhere truer than in a capitalist democracy where our choices drive the market and our civil society through our vote and subsequent participation in the democratic process.  A functional democracy that intends to be sustainable cannot be treated as a spectator sport by the citizens.  It is very much a contact sport that requires educated and fact based active participation if it is to benefit the voting citizens. At the core of that participatory democracy is an empowered citizen population that understand their own self-interest.

Each persona’s self-interest is not one-dimensional because it needs to address the interest of a person in the four functional roles, namely
• Worker
• Consumer
• Investor
• Citizen
If we want high pay as workers, we need to understand that we cannot have all our goods and services free or cheap.  If we want high return on investment form our 401K or Pension, regardless of the morality of the organizations delivering those high returns, as citizens and consumers are we willing to accept the cost of profit making by way of pollution in our water supply or the sub-prime crisis that leads to our job loss and home foreclosure?

It is true we come into every situation for a purpose, but just like Goldilocks realized, we need to exclude the extreme choices of “Too Hot” and “Too Cold” to find what is “just right” and then pursue it while balancing our self-interest.  Such is the case when shaping public policy.  Stakeholders start in extreme positions and with dialogue, facts and consensus building a workable balance could be established for progress to happen.

Please join My Guest Bukola Bello of Vision Mai LLC and me to engage in this very important conversation so we get it just right. We need to harmonize our multifaceted self-interest to build a solid foundation for a sustainable democracy which is the underpinning of our empowered lives.  The rules of engagement for our lives are shaped by the public policies in play. Let’s make sure we lay down these policies just right so we can build on it!

 

More Here!

Real Challenges and People Share Their Collaborations By David B. Savage

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Business
Real Challenges and People Share Their Collaborations By David B. Savage

2017 Break Through To Yes with Collaboration, David B. Savage Show Episodes;
www.davidbsavage.com
https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2492/break-through-to-yes-with-collaboration
# First Broadcast Theme Featured Guests
1 January 26th Collaboration and Leadership Bob Acton & David Mitchell
2 February 2nd Collaboration and Sports Tristen Chernove & Martin Parnell
3 February 9th Collaboration and Organizational Culture Mike Thompson &
Stephen Hobbs
4 February 16th Collaboration, Company Dispute Resolution, and Mindfulness Julie Murray
5 February 23rd Collaboration and Critical Thinking in This Age of Lies Doreen Liberto & Chuck Rose
6 March 2nd Collaboration, Europe, and Rotary International Elisabeth Delaygue Bevan & Florian Wackermann
7 March 9th Collaboration and Human Sexual Trafficking Cliff Wiebe & Lance Kadatz
8 March 16th Collaboration, Human Resources and Global Networks   Amy Schabacker Dufrane & Japman Bajaj
9 March 23rd Collaboration, Secret Marathons and Going the Extra Mile Martin Parnell, Kate McKenzie, & Shawn Anderson
10 March 30th Collaboration, Leadership and Disruptive Technologies Alice Reimer & Jim Gibson
11 April 6th Collaboration, Negotiation, and Mediation Jeff Cohen
12 April 13th Collaborative Global Initiative Tool Kit;  a panel on solutions to current challenges Doreen Liberto, Kathy Porter & Jeff Cohen
13 April 20th Global Audience Live Call In  
discussions on collaboration, negotiation, dispute resolution, and systems design. You are the guest

Climate Change Battles; Where is the Collaboration? By David B. Savage

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Business
Climate Change Battles; Where is the Collaboration? By David B. Savage

I am saddened by the constant battle for higher ground in the Climate Change Public Relations Wars. Where is the intelligence? Where is the collaboration? Where is the innovation? Where is the commitment? Our planet and our grandchildren deserve far better than this.

Like the famous painting shown here, the battle rages on and while there are peacemakers, where are those making the necessary changes? Or in the energy battles, will we continue to cut down those with great technical knowledge and reduce those with a great social conscience?

Like politics, in the climate discussion, the battles take the forefront while the war is being lost. It matters little who has a more acceptable or stronger social message, we must fix this mess. We must reduce emissions of all kinds. We must stop this dangerous trend.

Here is what I experience today (click the links to websites as you read);

1) Before the Flood: Leonardo DiCaprio hopes his new film will inspire climate action

Before the Flood article
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/14/before-the-flood-leonardo-dicaprio-hopes-his-new-film-will-inspire-climate-action

2) Director of DiCaprio’s Before The Flood documentary ‘horrified’ by Alberta oilsands

Horrified by Tar Sands
http://www.calgarysun.com/2016/10/26/director-horrified-by-alberta-oilsands-in-leonardo-dicaprios-climate-change-doc-before-the-flood

3) this is where backgrounds, perceptions, and judgments divert us all into separate “camps”. Let’s move forward with additional perspectives.

4) Emissions by Country

EPA CO2 Emissions by Country
https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/global-greenhouse-gas-emissions-data#Country

5) The oil sands industry currently accounts for approximately 0.12% of global GHG emissions. (Environment Canada 2015)

Share of Global CO2 Emissions
http://www.energy.alberta.ca/OilSands/791.asp

6) The IEA forecasts that in the next 25 years oil sands production in Canada will increase by more than three million barrels per day, “but the emissions of this additional production is equal to only 23 hours of emissions of China — not even one day,”

IEA on Oil Sands Emissions
http://business.financialpost.com/news/energy/new-emissions-from-canadas-oil-sands-extremely-low-says-ieas-chief-economist

7) Cowspiracy

What’s 10 x fossil fuel’s impact?
http://www.cowspiracy.com/

8) Transitioning

How do we go to renewables?
http://theconversation.com/phasing-out-fossil-fuels-for-renewables-may-not-be-a-straightforward-swap-54108

9) Energy Education

Primary Energy Information
http://energyeducation.ca/encyclopedia/Primary_energy

10) More energy sources including nuclear

Nuclear and other energy
http://www.nucleartourist.com/basics/why.htm

11) Four Reasons Why the Transition From Fossil Fuels to a Green Energy Era Is Gaining Traction
Change is happening now
http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/30259-four-reasons-why-the-transition-from-fossil-fuels-to-a-green-energy-era-is-gaining-traction

12) Cumulative Effects
realize that cumulative effects are the elephant in the room.
http://www.ceanalytic.com/

Cumulative Effects

Call to Action;

Remember the saying; “Bull shit baffles brains”? Too often, special interest groups and powerful organizations divert us from finding our own truth. Let’s collaboration, learn what is true for us, explore and commit to innovation and, most importantly, change our own behaviors and purchasing.

Rather than give more of your money to King Leonardo with his massive yachts, or Al Gore as he flies the world to end (the use of jet fuel?) emissions, support oil interests, or keep buying large vehicles and consuming cheap energy like there is no accountability, let’s take our own decisions and put our time and money where we intelligently decide.

You have access to the internet, do your own fact checking! You have a global network, collaborate for a better tomorrow. Let’s talk.

As we explore (and Break Through to Yes: Unlocking the Possible within a Culture of Collaboration , here are few suggestions that I take to heart to reduce my own impact on climate change and GHG emissions;

a) walk most everywhere. Take public transit wherever it is too far to walk. Ride your bike! Cars are can be used as a secondary transport system for long distances as a backup, not a primary source. Think of moving around your neighborhood after supper rather than turning on the TV.

b) turn off stuff, especially lights. An estimated 25- 40% of our home energy use is “vampire power” (those 27 clocks and flatscreen TVs that must be ready to immediately turn on 24/7, the internet of everything (where everything in our homes is being connected to the internet…) homes

c) elect to purchase renewables from your electrical provider.

d) educate ourselves on energy and buy/ consume accordingly. Can we have an intelligent learning conversation on wind, sun, nuclear, oil, natural gas, geothermal,…?

e) get involved in networks/ organizations/ conversations that encourage healthy learning from diverse perspectives (rather than blaming and shaming).

f) eat less beef and more veggies…

g) start an energy literacy group and understand interests, outcomes, and directions.

h) Live in a Net Zero home

Net Zero Homes
http://zeroenergyproject.org/

i) Think sustainability, think collaboration, lead as if the future matters.

ThinkSustainAbility
http://thinksustainability.ca/

What you can do?

What will you do today?

The Collaborative Global Initiative is a group of professionals with very diverse views and backgrounds on energy and environmental protection that are changing the conversations between stakeholders to create a better future for all. CGI
http://www.collaborativeglobalinitiative.com/

Be the change.

Let’s start this change now. Let’s work together.

Let’s Break Through to Yes with Collaboration.

2017 weekly series starts January 26th!

10 Great Business Books of 2016 By David Savage

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Business
10 Great Business Books of 2016 By David Savage

Start 2017 with greater skill and purpose. Read these 10 Great Business Books of 2016.

Ten Great Business / Non-Fiction Books of 2016

As selected by David B. Savage www.davidbsavage.com

  • The Power of Tenacity; 3 Things You’ll Need to Make Your Mark in Life by Dr. Peter Legge,
  • Bad Judgement; The Myths of First Nations Equality and Judicial Independence in Canada by Judge John Reilly,
  • Achieving Longevity; How Great Firms Prosper Through Entrepreneurial Thinking by Jim Dewald,
  • Forging Grit by Mike Thompson and Steve Caldwell,
  • Elon Musk by Ashlee Vance,
  • It’s My Pleasure: The Impact of Extraordinary Talent and a Compelling Culture by Dee Ann Turner,
  • Counter Clockwise: Mindful Health the Power of Possibility by Ellen J. Langer,
  • Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace) by Chade- Meng Tan,
  • Mastering Leadership by Robert J. Anderson, William A. Adams,
  • And, of course, Break Through To Yes: Unlocking the Possible within a Culture of Collaboration by David B. Savage. http://tinyurl.com/h84prqs

    More Here!

When Will We Rebuild Our Barn? By David Savage

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Business
When Will We Rebuild Our Barn? By David Savage

Today, many people focus solely on what’s in it for them. This has led to significant decay in services, infrastructure, economy, environment, trust, respect for public institutions, and, most importantly, in relationships. Think about what’s in it for us. A self-righteous manipulator or an inspirational innovator; your choice, your leadership, our world.
Let’s work together better to redesign and build a new barn that serves our shared future.

More Here!

COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION: HOW TO STAND OUT AND OPEN DOORS THROUGH YOUR WRITTEN WORD by Hemda Mizrahi and Elaine Rosenblum

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Business
COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION: HOW TO STAND OUT AND OPEN DOORS THROUGH YOUR WRITTEN WORD by Hemda Mizrahi and Elaine Rosenblum

Elaine Rosenblum Head Shot

How can you negotiate better, improve your self-presentation skills, and prevent misunderstandings that may emerge from e-communications, such as texting and emailing? Elaine Rosenblum, JD, an expert in COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION, joined me on “Turn the Page” to share tactics that will enable you to open doors through your written and spoken words.

Listen to our conversation to hear the full range of her suggestions and illustrations.

Elaine states, “To avoid potential miscommunication, SPECIFICITY is as important as shifting from judgmental to neutral language, especially in texting or emailing people you don’t know well, or in professional interactions.”

She provides two examples:

MICHAEL, AN EMORY MBA STUDENT PITCHING HIMSELF FOR A JOB
Elaine suggests to Michael: Instead of  “I think I have the skills to do this job,” let your interviewers know, “I am an Emory MBA with four years of beverage marketing experience at Coca Cola and Starbucks. I can conduct business in English, French and Spanish.”

FROM INDIANA UNIVERSITY TO GOLDMAN SACHS
“Young people interviewing for first jobs typically only have internship experience and minimal workplace skills. It’s imperative for recent or soon-to-be grads to understand “transferable skills” and articulate what makes them uniquely interesting. This Indiana student was a poker prodigy at nine. Few college juniors can own this proposition. Poker also has transferable skills to Wall Street. The Goldman feedback was that telling an engaging “story” about his “poker gift” is what set him apart and landed him the “long-shot” position.  Even seasoned executives have to work to maintain their specificity when articulating.”

MORE ON SPECIFICITY
“Using “them,” “it,” or “that” as reference points in texting may not provide adequate context. While it takes more actual texting words, directly stating time and place or redefining who “them” or what “it” or “that” is can prevent misunderstandings.”

Elaine offers three examples:
Revise “What time are you meeting them?” to “What time are you meeting Susie and Tom tonight?”

Change “What’s bothering you about the erupting situation?” to “What exactly concerns you about the disagreement between Susie and Tom that seemed to arise at the party on Saturday night?”

Instead of “Do you plan to do that?” state “Do you plan to attend the 7:00 pm San Francisco trip meeting on Tuesday, 4/3?”

BOND IN WRITING…AND FACE-TO-FACE
“While verbal communication typically evaporates after we say it, written communications survive and can serve as meaningful reference points. Communicating with clarity is a leadership skill and way of standing out in a professional world that demands immediate communication and moves too quickly. In personal relationships, SPECIFICITY builds invaluable trust and enhances the bonding that we crave and continually seek out on social media.”

In emphasizing how we can communicate to avoid unnecessary conflict and strengthen interpersonal connections, Elaine suggests that we avoid OVERRELYING on the written word: “The emotional satisfaction of a face-to-face conversation is difficult to replicate on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat.”

RESOURCES THAT WILL GUIDE YOU TO “YES”
Improve your outcomes by going deeper in honing your collaborative communication skills. Elaine recommends: “Getting to Yes” by Roger Fisher and William Uri; “Alone Together” by Sherry Turkle; and the ProForm U™ blog by Elaine Rosenblum.

Learn about ProFormU™, Elaine’s consulting and mentoring firm, which “teaches students and professionals at all levels to articulate, collaborate and negotiate in virtually any setting.”

While we focused on the tactic of specificity in this post, Elaine shares other requirements and nuances of collaborative communication in our conversation on “Turn the Page.” Here’s the link for you to listen now.

The Social Project Manager

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Business
The Social Project Manager

Peter Taylor

Rick A. Morris interviews Peter Taylor about his latest book – The Social Project Manager (Balancing Collaboration with Centralised Control in a Project Driven World)
Social project management is a non-traditional way of organising projects and managing project performance and progress aimed at delivering, at the enterprise level, a common goal for the business but harnessing the performance advantages of a collaborative community.  Peter is known for his humorous and direct delivery style and has entertained audiences around the world.  An author of several best-selling books, please join Rick and Peter on what will no doubt be one of the most entertaining hours you can spend learning about project management.

Tune in every Friday at 2pm PST to The Work/Life Balance

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Leaders: Want to Increase Your Score? Tune Up to Success!

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Business

freddie_ravel_142x130

Cheryl Esposito welcomes Freddie Ravel, Grammy-winning producer and jazz keyboardist. His concert performances, productions & recordings span three decades across six continents with icons Sergio Mendes, Al Jarreau, Madonna, Prince, Quincy Jones, the Boston Pops, & Carlos Santana.

Captivated by music since age 5, he trained as a youth, graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in music, & began performing worldwide with Brazilian master Sergio Mendes by age 23. His career soared & he experienced the power of music to affect the energy of the human spirit around the world.

Today the challenges in leadership, collaboration, & time are huge. Using music as a lens to view business, he created “Tune Up To Success!”, “Business Harmonics” and “Human Harmonics,” peak performance systems to enhance leadership, innovation & collaboration, with rave reviews from Apple, NASA, Citi.

Your leadership score isn’t a number. It’s the result of your ability to influence the melody, harmony, & rhythm of your organization to create great music – the score. Can you use actual music to learn how to do this? Yes! Want to know how to unlock people’s greatest potential to create your score? Join Cheryl Esposito & Freddie Ravel Friday 7/24/15 @ 10 a.m. on ‘Leading Conversations‘ to “Tune Up To Success!”

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