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Operational Resilience with Mike Campbell (Fusion Risk Management)

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Variety
Operational Resilience with Mike Campbell (Fusion Risk Management)

Join me 9am EST November 11, 2021!

Due to COVID and the impact felt by all industries, Operational Resilience has become a major focal point for organizations. Join me as I talk with Fusion Risk Management CEO, Mike Campbell. Mike clears up the confusion between organizational resilience and operations resilience, and the importance for organization’s for focus on resilience. We’ll also talk about the various components that make up operational resilience and how an organization can begin to tear down the silos, while building up resilience. Mike will also talk about the new paradigm organization’s face with employees working from home, and how the traditional ‘everyone-back-in-the-office’ approach may no longer work going forward. We’ll also discuss how strong operational resilience can help organizations with decision-making, especially during disasters, crises, and incidents, when the demand for information goes up and the time to provide it goes down.

A very enjoyable chat about operational resilience, with lots of insights for leaders. Don’t miss it! Listen to Variety podcasts.

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Avoiding Decision Disasters: Integrating the Gut and the Head By Maureen Metcalf

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Business
Avoiding Decision Disasters: Integrating the Gut and the Head By Maureen Metcalf

This guest blog was written as a companion to the VoiceAmerica Interview with Dr. Gleb Tsipursky on May 23, Tools for Avoiding Disastrous Decisions. In the interview and the blog, Gleb explores how we can balance intuition and data based decision making to arrive at the most effective business outcomes. He explores some common misconceptions and offers recommendations to avoid them.

Let’s say you’re interviewing a new applicant for a job and you feel something is off. You can’t quite put your finger on it, but you’re a bit uncomfortable with this person. She says all the right things, her resume is great, she’d be a perfect hire for this job – except your gut tells you otherwise.

Should you go with Your Gut?

In such situations, your default reaction should be to be suspicious of your gut. Research shows that job candidate interviews are actually poor indicators of future job performance.
Unfortunately, most employers tend to trust their guts over their heads and give jobs to people they like and perceive as part of their in-group, rather than simply the most qualified applicant. In other situations, however, it actually does make sense to rely on gut instinct to make a decision.

Yet research on decision-making shows that most business leaders don’t know when to rely on their gut and when not to. While most studies have focused on executives and managers, research shows the same problem applies to doctors, therapists and other professionals.

This is the kind of challenge I encounter when I consult with companies on how to better handle workplace relationships. Research that I and others have conducted on decision-making offers some clues on when we should – and shouldn’t – listen to our guts. The reactions of our gut are rooted in the more primitive, emotional and intuitive part of our brains that ensured survival in our ancestral environment. Tribal loyalty and immediate recognition of friend or foe were especially useful for thriving in that environment.

In modern society, however, our survival is much less at risk, and our gut is more likely to compel us to focus on the wrong information to make workplace and other decisions.
For example, is the job candidate mentioned above similar to you in race, gender, socioeconomic background? Even seemingly minor things like clothing choices, speaking style and gesturing can make a big difference in determining how you evaluate another person. According to research on nonverbal communication, we like people who mimic our tone, body movements and word choices. Our guts automatically identify those people as belonging to our tribe and being friendly to us, raising their status in our eyes.

This quick, automatic reaction of our emotions represents the autopilot system of thinking, one of the two systems of thinking in our brains. It makes good decisions most of the time but also regularly makes certain systematic thinking errors that scholars refer to as cognitive biases.

The other thinking system, known as the intentional system, is deliberate and reflective. It takes effort to turn on but it can catch and override the thinking errors committed by our autopilots. This way, we can address the systematic mistakes made by our brains in our workplace relationships and other areas of life.

Keep in mind that the autopilot and intentional systems are only simplifications of more complex processes, and that there is debate about how they work in the scientific community. However, for everyday life, this systems-level approach is very useful in helping us manage our thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

In regard to tribal loyalty, our brains tend to fall for the thinking error known as the “halo effect,” which causes some characteristics we like and identify with to cast a positive “halo” on the rest of the person, and its opposite the “horns effect,” in which one or two negative traits change how we view the whole. Psychologists call this “anchoring,” meaning we judge this person through the anchor of our initial impressions.

Overriding the Gut

Now let’s go back to our job interview example.

Say that the person went to the same college you did. You are more likely to hit it off. Yet, just because a person is similar to you does not mean she will do a good job. Likewise, just because someone is skilled at conveying friendliness does not mean she will do well at tasks that require technical skills rather than people skills.

The research is clear that our intuitions don’t always serve us well in making the best decisions (and, for a business person, bringing in the most profit). Scholars call intuition a troublesome decision tool that requires adjustments to function properly. Such reliance on intuition is especially harmful to workplace diversity and paves the path to bias in hiring, including in terms of race, disability, gender and sex.

Despite the numerous studies showing that structured interventions are needed to overcome bias in hiring, unfortunately business leaders and HR personnel tend to over-rely on unstructured interviews and other intuitive decision-making practices. Due to the autopilot system’s overconfidence bias, a tendency to evaluate our decision-making abilities as better than they are, leaders often go with their guts on hires and other business decisions rather than use analytical decision-making tools that have demonstrably better outcomes.

A good fix is to use your intentional system to override your tribal sensibilities to make a more rational, less biased choice that will more likely result in the best hire. You could note ways in which the applicant is different from you – and give them “positive points” for it – or create structured interviews with a set of standardized questions asked in the same order to every applicant.

So if your goal is to make the best decisions, avoid such emotional reasoning, a mental process in which you conclude that what you feel is true, regardless of the actual reality.

When your Gut May Be Right

Let’s take a different situation. Say you’ve known someone in your work for many years, collaborated with her on a wide variety of projects and have an established relationship. You already have certain stable feelings about that person, so you have a good baseline.
Imagine yourself having a conversation with her about a potential collaboration. For some reason, you feel less comfortable than usual. It’s not you – you’re in a good mood, well-rested, feeling fine. You’re not sure why you’re not feeling good about the interaction since there’s nothing obviously wrong. What’s going on?

Most likely, your intuitions are picking up subtle cues about something being off. Perhaps that person is squinting and not looking you in the eye or smiling less than usual. Our guts are good at picking up such signals, as they are fine-tuned to pick up signs of being excluded from the tribe.

Maybe it’s nothing. Maybe that person is having a bad day or didn’t get enough sleep the night before. However, that person may also be trying to pull the wool over your eyes. When people lie, they behave in ways that are similar to other indicators of discomfort, anxiety and rejection, and it’s really hard to tell what’s causing these signals.
Overall, this is a good time to take your gut reaction into account and be more suspicious than usual.

The gut is vital in our decision-making to help us notice when something might be amiss. Yet in most situations when we face significant decisions about workplace relationships, we need to trust our head more than our gut in order to make the best decisions.

About the Author
Dr. Gleb Tsipursky helps leaders and organizations avoid disaster through science-based strategies for effective decision-making and emotional and social intelligence. He is a well-known scholar, entrepreneur, author, speaker, consultant, coach, and activist in these areas. Gleb researches effective decision-making, goal achievement, emotional and social intelligence, meaning and purpose, mental health and emotional well-being, and altruism as a professor at Ohio State Universitiy in the Decision Sciences Collaborative and the History Department. He runs a nonprofit that popularizes pragmatic applications of these academic topics to politics, business, nonprofits, and other areas of daily life, Intentional Insights. He regularly publishes pieces on these topics in prominent venues such as Time, Psychology Today, The Conversation, Salon, Lead Change Group, Alternet, Truthout, Lifehack, Elite Daily, The Plain Dealer, The Dallas Morning News, Skeptical Inquirer, Patheos, Inside Higher Ed, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Huffington Post and elsewhere. He appears regularly on network TV, such as affiliates of ABC and Fox; radio stations such as NPR, KGO (San Francisco), 700WLW (Cincinnati) Sunny 95 (Columbus), KLRD (Dallas), and others; as well as podcasts and videocasts. An Amazon best-selling author, he wrote Find Your Purpose Using Science and other books, as well as over 25 peer-reviewed articles in academic venues.

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Improve Your Functioning In Stressful Situations: A Proven Strategy By Dr. Suzanne B. Phillips

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Variety
Improve Your Functioning In Stressful Situations:  A Proven Strategy By Dr. Suzanne B. Phillips

This blog recognizes that stress reduces our performance be it in academics, sports, work goals,the arts, etc. It discusses a proven strategy for improving functioning in stressful situations,”Cognitive Reappraisal”-  defining the situation from a new perspective. Readers will be interested in the surprising effectiveness of this strategy across research studies.

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How to Make the Right Decision: Going From Worrier to Warrior in 10 Easy Steps by Hemda Mizrahi & Benson Simmonds

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Business
How to Make the Right Decision: Going From Worrier to Warrior in 10 Easy Steps by Hemda Mizrahi & Benson Simmonds

Benson Simmonds

Award-winning actor, coach, and writer Benson Simmonds joined me on “Turn the Page” to discuss his recently published book, “SOULAR POWER  – Unlocking the Eight Gates to Joy and Abundance,” which reflects his 20 years of study in the dramatic arts, Kabbalah, Eastern Philosophy, and Mysticism. Listen to this episode to access greater meaning, joy, and success in your life.

Benson expanded upon our conversation after the show, by sharing how you can apply the key tactics he offered to the process of making “good” decisions. If you’re generally decisive and find yourself in new waters with an unprecedented anxiety or conflict that’s causing you to feel “stuck,” this approach will help you to move forward with greater peace of mind. If you frequently  have a hard time making decisions, Benson’s “ten steps” will teach you how to choose more quickly, and with greater confidence.

Here’s what he taught me—in his own words:

We’ve all been there – gripped by fear when needing to make an important decision. We’re afraid of making the “wrong” choice, or one that will result in a negative outcome for ourselves or someone else. Whether you’re making business decision, considering whether to leave or stay in a relationship, making choices regarding your health, school, or even what color shoes to buy, the underlying constant is that feeling for fear. When in fear, you are in worrier (ego) mode, as opposed to warrior (soul) mode, that place from which you can tap into the power of your soul. You soul is your untapped brain potential, that part of you that is connected to a divine source of unlimited joy, love and expansion.

What about the old, “make a list of pros and cons, so you can detach emotionally” approach? That strategy removes your emotions instead of inspiring you to use your emotional intelligence, which you actually need to make the best decision.

So what is the key to making a good decision? Shifting out of fear and into love, which is of course an emotional state. Shifting from ego to soul, from worrier to warrior. Here are the 10 simple and profound steps you can take to make your best decision.

STEP ONE
When you are in ego/fear mode the overwhelming message you receive is “lack and limitation.” This message conveys that there is never enough, and that you are not enough. To shift, take a deep breath and say, “I AM ENOUGH. THIS MOMENT IS ENOUGH.” As you do this, you’ll immediately begin to slow down the ego/worrier self and connect with your soul. The overriding message of the soul is “YOU ARE ENOUGH” and “there is always enough,” so you WON’T be limited or losing out regardless of which decision you make.

STEP TWO
Realize that you can choose to tap into something larger than yourself, your soul. By making this choice and stating out loud, “I CHOOSE TO MAKE THIS A SOULAR POWERED DECISION,” you’ll expand past the information that’s available through your ego/fear. Instead, you’ll tap into a power that has a wealth of data beyond the “facts” as you see them. You’ll surpass “black and white thinking,” which limits your choices, to “FULL SPECTRUM THINKING,” which opens you up to new possibilities. Your decision will be informed by the deeper wisdom you’re able to access through this expanded view.

STEP THREE
Ask yourself: “What are five to ten things I LOVE about myself?”  Be sure to state your answers out loud and use “I LOVE…” in every sentence. For example, “I LOVE my sense of humor. I LOVE my intelligence. I LOVE that I’m a survivor. I LOVE that I try to be kind,” etc. By focusing on what you LOVE, you’ll shift out of fear and into love (become a LOVE GENERATOR instead of a LOVE SEEKER), which will help you to make the best decision.

STEP FOUR
Convey GRATITUDE STATEMENTS that express thanks for your shift to “warrior:” “Thank you (God, universe, the divine, higher powers, etc.) for the ease with which I’ve released my need to make the right decision.” By repeating this a few times, you’ll liberate the pressure your ego/worrier side has placed upon you and begin to feel a newfound ease about the decision. Here’s another version of a gratitude statement: “Thank you God (divine, etc.) for the ease which with I’ve made the right decision.”

STEP FIVE
Envision yourself within the PYRAMID OF PROTECTION: Imagine that you’re sitting or standing inside a four-walled, three-dimensional pyramid. There is a wall slanting up to a point above your head on all four sides of you. The floor is the fifth wall. Divine light from above infuses the walls of the pyramid with unconditional love and joy. Feel yourself and the inside of the pyramid becoming enveloped in divine light. From inside the pyramid say, “I am now connected to and protected by the divine.”

STEP SIX
While in the pyramid of protection, say, “EVERY DECISION I MAKE IS NOW FOR THE SAKE OF THE DIVINE.” By repeating this statement within the pyramid, you’ll take even more of the pressure off. You can also say, “EVERYTHING I DO IS NOW FOR THE SAKE OF THE DIVINE.” By doing this, you’ll remind yourself, that it’s not about you; it’s about what you can contribute.

STEP SEVEN
When you make a soular powered decision, you’ll CHOOSE THE OPTION THAT FEELS THE MOST EXPANSIVE. Simply stated, fear contracts and love expands. When you are afraid, your body pulls inward and in that moment, it’s all about you. When you are feeling love, you naturally expand your arms and want to share, celebrate and contribute. Now, take a moment to reflect on your decision. Which choice feels more expansive to you? The more expansive decision is the best one.

STEP EIGHT
ASKING EXPANSIVE QUESTIONS will help you tap into your soular power and make the best decision. Rather than asking negative questions, like “what will happen if I make the wrong decision?,” or “why am I a loser?,” ask EMPOWERING questions, like: “HOW CAN I EXPERIENCE MORE JOY WHILE MAKING THIS DECISION?,” and “WHY AM I A WINNER REGARDLESS OF THE DECISION I MAKE?” Your brain is a super computer and it will provide you with an answer to any question you ask. Most of us are unaware of the questions we are asking ourselves subconsciously. By asking yourself specific expansive questions, you’ll receive answers that will inspire you to make the best choice.

STEP NINE
BLESS FIVE PEOPLE IN YOUR LIFE. Think of the person and say “blessings to your for health, happiness, abundance, etc.” Even if the decision is about leaving a boss or relationship, send that boss or current spouse/lover blessings. This will very quickly shift you out of fear and into love, opening up your divine channel of joy, love and expansion even more.

STEP TEN
When making your decision, eliminate the need to “be good.” Trying to “be good” can lure you into a decision that is based on self-sacrifice or martyrdom, which your ego convinces you is “noble.” This leaves you stuck in worrier mode. Instead, SEE GOOD, the good in yourself and that of others. A true soular powered decision is a WIN-WIN for all parties involved.

In applying these 10 steps, you’ll make the “best” decision and ENJOY the process of choosing. You’ll feel more joyous and loving, which will contribute to even better decisions as you move through your day.

Benson shares blessings for you to “embrace your soular power and open your heart to feel and attract more joy, love and abundance in every moment.”

His book, “SOULAR POWER – Unlocking the Eight Gates of Joy and Abundance” is available on Amazon. You can reach him at soularpowerbook@gmail.com if you’d like to find out more about his spiritual and business coaching services.

Whether or not you see yourself as a “spiritual” person, you’ll gain a practical approach to improving results in every aspect of your life by listening to our conversation.

We invite you to “pay it forward” and expand your fortune by sharing the link to the episode and blog post with your on and off-line communities.

How to Fail Intelligently

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Empowerment
How to Fail Intelligently

Believe

It happens to us all. We make mistakes. Even when we feel we’ve made the best decision based on the information we have at the time. Sometimes failure comes with little to no negative consequences and other times, it comes with a much higher price. In many situations, we stop ourselves short because of the fear of failure. We thwart our ability to proceed based on the crippling regrets of past failures.

Fortunately, a recent concept known as intelligent failure has shed some much needed light on the notion that one can learn, maximize, and even accelerate through the act of trial and error. Note the emphasis on the term, error. If we are able to emphasize the idea that innovation can be made possible by accepting a certain risk of failure that is inherent in new ideas and approaches, we can grow our risk tolerance and comfort with failure in healthy ways.

The reality is that no matter how hard we try to avoid failure, it will happen. Intelligent failure is the intentional practice of reacting to these situations more productively and less defensively. This is a skill that anyone can learn. It is the hope anyone fearful of decision-making welcomes.

So how does one learn the skill of intelligent failure? Well, Commander Chris Hadfield sets a pretty amazing example. I’ve blogged about it back in August when I was speaking at a conference where Chris was the keynote. His message was about hope and how planning for failure builds greater confidence and successful outcomes.

Often people are afraid to talk about their failures. Perhaps is is the fear of ridicule or simply dredging up the painful memories. When we talk about failure, we help others gain a different perspective and learn to avoid making the same mistakes.

Like squeezing the juice from a lemon to make lemonade, when we fail intelligently, we look at the experience for the opportunity to extract as many lessons as we can as part of our journey to success. Failure can teach us a lot.

On this week’s episode of Your Authentic Life, I interview Heather Clarke, an executive coach who will share tips about intelligent failure. Tune in to VoiceAmerica’s Empowerment Channel, Wednesday at 2:00pm ET or 11am PT, to hear this interview live.

The biggest tip I can share with you is to push through feelings about failure. It is human nature to be staunchly averse to feeling the embarrassment or shame that is linked to talking about mistakes. It can pull down your self esteem if there isn’t a trusting environment to explore the learning that comes from these experiences. When you don’t talk about it or deal with it early, there can be a tendency to pretend it didn’t happen or that you didn’t have a part in it. No one has the ability to learn or draft a new course for success as quickly or successfully as could have been possible. As Robert F. Kennedy said, “Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.”

I’m excited about this episode to liberate the stigma related to failure and hope you’ll give us a listen on Wednesday. Remember, it isn’t about celebrating failure, but rather staying curious and open to learning about what it can teach you when it occurs.

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