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8 Things That No Prepper Should Be Without

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Health & Wellness
8 Things That No Prepper Should Be Without

You never know what’s around the corner, and it’s always better to be prepared with items that could keep you alive in an emergency. If you’re faced with an extreme weather event, political crisis, conflict, or long-term electricity failure, having the right tools and equipment could mean the difference between making it safely through the emergency and being caught without the basics for life.

Ready to get your survival kit ready and keep yourself and your family alive? Here are seven survival essentials that no prepper should be without.

1. Water Purifier

We can survive for up to two months without food, but only 8-21 days without water. If access to town (or bore) water is cut off, you’ll need a backup that’s safe to consume. For these situations, a personal water purifier and/or water purification tablets give you the option of using other water sources you can find while dealing with potentially harmful bacteria. Of course, if you can, it’s best to boil the water first. 

2. Freeze Dryers

After water, the next thing you’ll need is food, and you can only live off crackers for so long before developing a case of scurvy. Today, freeze dryers can be used to dehydrate practically any consumable — from fruit that’s high in vitamin C to soups, meals, and even ice cream. Before a disaster actually occurs, freeze-dry several days’ worth of meals and store them in vacuum-sealed bags. These meals can be stored for several decades, and a few days of work will be well worth it in the long run.

3. First Aid Kit

A survival first aid kit is essential for dealing with minor injuries if no hospital is available. It allows you to deal with things like cuts, burns, eye irritations, and congestion on the spot and prevent wound-related infections from developing. While any first aid kit is far better than nothing, it’s a good idea to invest in a large disaster-preparedness kit with enough medical-grade supplies for a group. You can also find first aid kits that are tailored to specific disasters, such as wildfires.

4. Swiss Army Knife

The Swiss Army Knife was developed in 1880 by the Swiss Army (surprise, surprise!). This multi-tool pocket knife includes an impressive 33 functions with everything from a mini screwdriver and letter opener to knives that are suitable for gutting prey and eating the meals you’ve preserved with a freeze dryer. Even with all of these multitasking components, the compact 3.5-inch size fits easily in your pocket, and it’ll only cost around $25 — a small price to pay for the many practical functions it offers.

5. Headlamp

Whether you face a power outage or a forest at night, a good headlamp will give you the visibility you need to navigate your surroundings and assist others near you while keeping your hands free. Headlamps that are built for survival typically have a very strong beam that can reach a distance of over 330 feet. Many models also include a strobe setting for alerting others that you’re in distress.

6. Shortwave Radio

Communication is vital if you become trapped or distanced from help. Remember the 2018 film Bird Box? The radio was the only way that the fugitives were about to find a safe haven. Shortwave radios, also called weather radios and survival radios, usually offer multiple charging options — including solar, hand-crank, batteries, and power source. Many also include a port for charging your mobile devices, a reading lamp, and an SOS alarm to help emergency workers find your location.

7. Shelter

Survival shelters can include anything from sheets of canvas and one-man sleeping bags to family-size tents with the works. For your survival kit, prepare for the number of people in your family with appropriate shelter from wind, rain, snow, and extreme cold. At the minimum, include a tear-proof polyethylene sleeping bag or survival blanket in each person’s backpack plus a canvas tarp to keep out the wind.

8. Lightweight Backpack

All of this careful preparation will count for naught if you don’t have a good backpack to keep it all together and ready to pick up and go in an instant. For survival situations, you want a lightweight, rugged backpack with plenty of pockets for storing your gear. If possible, store your water filter, the food you’ve prepared using freeze dryers, your first aid kit, tools, radio, and shelter in separate compartments for easy access. 

You Can Never Be Too Prepared 

In the best-case scenario, you’ll never need to pack and leave your house at a moment’s notice. However, it’s much better to be over-prepared than caught by surprise. 

In addition to collecting these must-have prepper items and preparing freeze-dryer meals, make sure that you continually brush up your skills in first aid, knot-tying, fire-starting, and hunting and foraging in the wild. You’ll feel much more confident to face life with ease and help others who might need assistance along the way.

TIME TO GO! Emergency Prep

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Empowerment
TIME TO GO! Emergency Prep

Go bags.jpeg

If an emergency occurred while you were at home, work, or play, and you are forced to evacuate to another location, would you be prepared or panicked? This scenario could happen anywhere at any time.  With preparation, you will be ready to go.

A “Go Bag” is a bag filled with all the necessities you, your family, and your animals will need for one to three days. You will want to pack this emergency kit for every vehicle as well as have an additional one in your home in a closet or space closest to your exit door. The reason for keeping a “Go Bag” in your car at all times is because you may be caught in an earthquake, fire, or another disaster when you are not at home. By also keeping a “Go Bag” at home, in the event of an immediate evacuation, you will have additional reinforcements.

 

Here’s what you need to pack an emergency “Go Bag”

In a backpack, small suitcase, shoulder bag, or roller bag pack the following:

First Aid kit

Duplicate chargers for phones, tablets, and computers

Copies of important documents including passport, drivers license, credit cards, insurance

Work gloves

Warm gloves

Towelettes

Small towel

Bottled water (1 gallon per person per day)

Thick Blanket

Walking shoes

Socks

Warm jacket

Peanut butter

Honey

Protein bars

Personal hygiene kit with a toothbrush, soap, medications

Matches

Candle

Flashlight and headlamp with extra batteries

Eating utensils and plates

Breathing masks (Niosh-N95)

Clothing change

Reading Glasses

Extra set of keys to home, office, etc.

Pet necessities: food, leash, medications

Cash

Toilet Paper

At your home, have a sign already made with your name, phone number, address, and the words “SAFELY EVACUATED” sitting on top of your “Go Bag” accompanied by a roll of blue painter’s tape. In an evacuation, when you exit your home, tape the sign (time permitting) to the door so the first responders will know that you have left. When told to evacuate, do so without question.  Take one vehicle to avoid clogging escape routes. Stay calm.

Other things to do in preparation for an emergency:

  • Make a rescue plan with your family and practice an evacuation.
  • Decide where you will meet up if separated and where to go in an emergency.
  • Back up important documents to the cloud or keep paper copies in a safe deposit box.
  • Get a landline phone for emergency purposes only. They work without electricity.
  • Know how to manually open automatic gates and garage doors.
  • Connect with neighbors to create a support safety team.
  • Keep your gas tank full on all vehicles.
  • Store your laptop, keys, purse, wallet, and other “must take” items in one place for swift retrieval.
  • Sign up for emergency alerts vis nixle.com and www.cwsalerts.com

Earthquakes may not provide any warning, and a devastating wildfire may give you only a minute or two to grab your family and your bag.  Natural disasters are on the rise and catastrophes can happen to you. Get ready to go!

More at: https://www.lamorindaweekly.com/archive/issue1507/Packing-an-emergency-Go-Bag.html

©2021 Cynthia Brian is a New York Times best-selling author of several books, TV/Radio personality/producer, lecturer, columnist, enrichment coach, and Founder/Executive Director of Be the Star You Are!® 501 c3. In her spare time, Cynthia can be found working in her garden or playing with her barnyard of adopted animals. www.CynthiaBrian.com

Listen to StarStyle®-Be the Star You Are! on the Voice America Radio Network Wednesdays 4-5pm PT LIVE or in the archives at https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2206/be-the-star-you-are

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The Challenges of BCM & DR Programs – Part 1

Posted by Editor on
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Variety
The Challenges of BCM & DR Programs – Part 1

No matter the industry, the size of your organization, or the location(s) of your business, Business Continuity Management (BCM) and Disaster Recovery (DR) programs always seem to experience a common set of challenges. Drawing from 20+ years of experience, Alex Fullick will discuss these many challenges that seem to transcend industry and location – and which seem to appear at one time or another – in every BCM/DR program. Listen in to hear why some of these challenges occur and how to deal with them when you begin to encounter the same issues in your programfullick-Promo-Variety.jpg

 

March 1, 2018: Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery – Psychology and Disasters

Posted by Editor on
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Variety
March 1, 2018: Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery – Psychology and Disasters

Many organizations have plans to help their employees evacuate buildings and get to safe locations and then is the extent of most employee-related BCM plans. But disasters affect people differently and sometimes those impacts aren’t know right away and don’t appear until well after the situation. This episode will take BCM/DR practitioners to a deeper level and offer some insight on what additional topics need to be considered when creating long term employee focused safety and response plans. We speak with Registered Psychologist Dr, Oren Amitay who will talk to us about PTSD and how disaster affect people in different ways.

fullick-Promo-Variety.jpg

Psychology and Disasters

Posted by Editor on
0
Variety
Psychology and Disasters

Many organizations have plans to help their employees evacuate buildings and get to safe locations and then is the extent of most employee-related BCM plans. But disasters affect people differently and sometimes those impacts aren’t know right away and don’t appear until well after the situation. This episode will take BCM/DR practitioners to a deeper level and offer some insight on what additional topics need to be considered when creating long term employee focused safety and response plans. We speak with Registered Psychologist Dr, Oren Amitay who will talk to us about PTSD, how disasters affect people in different ways, how people respond to disasters and how we can recognize when someone is experiencing long term trauma – that might not have been easily identified at the time of the traumatic situation.Show Promo.jpg

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