Tag Archives

5 Articles

Business as the Adventure of Living with Katarina Nilsson By Heather Nichols

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
Business as the Adventure of Living with Katarina Nilsson By Heather Nichols

Would it be fun for you to have your business be an adventure? Would that light you up more than the struggle and lack of joy that so many people choose in this reality with their own businesses?

Perhaps there is something that you have always dreamed of creating that would like to be actualized now, or something that has been nudging you asking to be born?

What could you experience and choose if you didn’t have to wait for anything or anyone else? Would you create what you truly desire if you never had to consider failure or giving up as an option?

Come join Advanced Joy of Business facilitators Heather Nichols and Katarina Nilsson, two truly creative catalysts of change and expansion for a unique conversation into business and the creation of your life.

More Here!

HOW “THE HONEY BADGER” LEVELED UP TO WIN GOLDEN GLOVES by Dan Hayes and Hemda Mizrahi

Posted by Editor on
0
Business
HOW “THE HONEY BADGER” LEVELED UP TO WIN GOLDEN GLOVES by Dan Hayes and Hemda Mizrahi

“I don’t know if you’re going to win, but I know you’ll come out of this a better fighter.” Those were the words of professional boxer Mehdi Abidi to his friend Dan Hayes, just before a Golden Gloves (amateur boxing) tournament. Dan went on to win the tournament and became a top-ranked middleweight boxer representing Trinidad & Tobago.

Unable to participate in the 2016 Olympics in Rio due to a shoulder injury, Dan shares how this remark from Abidi precipitated a turning point in his career.

“Mehdi and I encourage each other before a match. I was consistently the favored fighter, and pre-competition Mehdi would say, “You got this!” So he really opened my perspective when, for the first time, he talked about leading into the fight with the intention to become a better fighter. Don’t get me wrong. I want to win, but in my early years as a competitive athlete, I was only focused on winning, (which made me more vulnerable to fear).”

Showing up to win with the intent to grow freed up Dan to give what he refers to as “100% effort, “ earning him the nick name “The Honey Badger,” in recognition of his fearlessness.  Dan counts mental fortitude and attitude as two of his strongest suits. He talks about the importance of learning to accept failure, knowing that you’ll have the confidence to bounce back.

My conversation with Dan brought to mind the research that guides sports psychologists and coaches in working with athletes. In whichever field you strive to be perform at your best, being aware of the psychological profile and mental skills of successful elite athletes can help you to level up as Dan did.

As presented in the go-to textbook, “Applied Sport Psychology: Personal Growth to Peak Performance” (2015), top performing athletes:

• Have high self confidence and expectations of success, with a positive attitude and thoughts about performance;

• Demonstrate the ability to self-regulate their arousal (to be simultaneously energized and relaxed);

• Feel in control and are able to perform with total concentration, focusing on the present task;

• View difficult situations as exciting and challenging, maintaining a productive perfectionism (high standards                 coupled with the flexibility to learn from mistakes), and a strong determination and commitment.

• Hone these mental skills: goal setting and imagery; developing competitive plans and arousal management                    techniques; and practicing arousal management, attention control, coping, and refocusing skills so that they                become automatic.

Journaling is a core methodology used by athletes to identify the conditions that characterize and facilitate their peak experiences. It’s through this approach that sports professionals chronicle feelings associated with performing at their best, along with what they learned from these moments. They also track:

• Stressors (on and off the field), manifestations of stress (anxiety, anger, frustration, etc.), and the related impact on    their performance;

• What they need from coaches and teammates, and how they can enhance the productivity of these relationships;

• How they can increase their confidence, awareness, and concentration, and what they observe about their                      performance when they improve in these areas;

• How they can train themselves to relax quickly, tuning into parts of the body that tend to hold more tension than        other areas;

• Strategies for focusing, coping in pressure situations, and controlling thoughts (self-talk) and arousal; and

• Mental preparation to get the most out of practice time, including how they can avoid permitting personal                     challenges to affect their play.

Sports journaling involves assessing the strategies that work, and those that don’t, in order to individualize the support systems and resources that offer the most beneficial investment opportunities for the competitor. Learning is as much of a focal point in between practices, as it is during practice and during fight—or game time.

Being led by an intention to grow while showing up to win, as “The Honey Badger” says, requires you to “Fail as much as you can. If you give 100%, you’ll come out better.”  The proof is in his golden gloves.

Hemda Mizrahi is a coach and consultant to high performers like professional athletes, who wish to replicate their peak experiences and continue to serve as role models by exceling as entrepreneurs.

Dan Hayes is currently on his World Championship journey. He fights out of the world famous Wild Card Boxing Club and is launching a boxing fitness and recovery studio in Los Angeles.

More Here!

Finding Meaning Through Storytelling

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
Finding Meaning Through Storytelling

Katherine Ketcham 250

Katherine Ketchum is a story teller and in the telling of the stories she explores some very profound thoughts and teachings. We will look at her book, “Experiencing Spirituality: Finding Meaning Through Storytelling” which was just released in paperback, Some of the things we hope to discuss are: how great wisdom stories can enrich our spiritual lives; how being “spiritual” is more than just being “non-religious;” the importance of imperfection and failure; and the need to experience rather than intellectualize spirituality. The book is one to sit and savor and I think this discussion will be the same. Come join us on ‘The Self Improvement Show‘ 6/18 @ 1pm PT

How to Fail Intelligently

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
How to Fail Intelligently

Believe

It happens to us all. We make mistakes. Even when we feel we’ve made the best decision based on the information we have at the time. Sometimes failure comes with little to no negative consequences and other times, it comes with a much higher price. In many situations, we stop ourselves short because of the fear of failure. We thwart our ability to proceed based on the crippling regrets of past failures.

Fortunately, a recent concept known as intelligent failure has shed some much needed light on the notion that one can learn, maximize, and even accelerate through the act of trial and error. Note the emphasis on the term, error. If we are able to emphasize the idea that innovation can be made possible by accepting a certain risk of failure that is inherent in new ideas and approaches, we can grow our risk tolerance and comfort with failure in healthy ways.

The reality is that no matter how hard we try to avoid failure, it will happen. Intelligent failure is the intentional practice of reacting to these situations more productively and less defensively. This is a skill that anyone can learn. It is the hope anyone fearful of decision-making welcomes.

So how does one learn the skill of intelligent failure? Well, Commander Chris Hadfield sets a pretty amazing example. I’ve blogged about it back in August when I was speaking at a conference where Chris was the keynote. His message was about hope and how planning for failure builds greater confidence and successful outcomes.

Often people are afraid to talk about their failures. Perhaps is is the fear of ridicule or simply dredging up the painful memories. When we talk about failure, we help others gain a different perspective and learn to avoid making the same mistakes.

Like squeezing the juice from a lemon to make lemonade, when we fail intelligently, we look at the experience for the opportunity to extract as many lessons as we can as part of our journey to success. Failure can teach us a lot.

On this week’s episode of Your Authentic Life, I interview Heather Clarke, an executive coach who will share tips about intelligent failure. Tune in to VoiceAmerica’s Empowerment Channel, Wednesday at 2:00pm ET or 11am PT, to hear this interview live.

The biggest tip I can share with you is to push through feelings about failure. It is human nature to be staunchly averse to feeling the embarrassment or shame that is linked to talking about mistakes. It can pull down your self esteem if there isn’t a trusting environment to explore the learning that comes from these experiences. When you don’t talk about it or deal with it early, there can be a tendency to pretend it didn’t happen or that you didn’t have a part in it. No one has the ability to learn or draft a new course for success as quickly or successfully as could have been possible. As Robert F. Kennedy said, “Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.”

I’m excited about this episode to liberate the stigma related to failure and hope you’ll give us a listen on Wednesday. Remember, it isn’t about celebrating failure, but rather staying curious and open to learning about what it can teach you when it occurs.

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)

RSS
Follow by Email