Tag Archives

17 Articles

Self-Control in the Garden

Posted by Cynthia Brian on
0
Empowerment
Self-Control in the Garden

 

Share StarStyle® Empowerment

“Inch by inch, life is a cinch. By the yard, it’s hard.” Popularized by Robert Schuller

Do you ever go to a restaurant extremely hungry and when you peruse the menu, you order more than you could ever eat? I am guilty of this trait whenever I visit a nursery or garden center. Before I go, I usually create a list of the four or five plants that I want and am ready to plant. But once there, all the magnificent flora intoxicates me with their beauty, and I end up buying more than I have time to put in the ground.

Not this year. I am exerting self-control and keeping it small. One of the reasons for limiting my purchases is that my garden is not sufficiently prepared for adding extras. Before I left on my European expedition, I thought I had everything under control. I had followed my own advice of pruning, weeding, feeding, seeding, and mulching the landscape. The few weeds that remained resembled short groundcover. But because of the rain and fog providing extra moisture, and the warm, sunny days whilst I was away, ideal conditions for abundant growth of both weeds and flowers were created. Upon my return, I was greeted by a gorgeous green jungle, albeit totally out-of-control blooms and blossoms as well as weeds as tall as I am.

The tender tiny mustard greens that I had been collecting for salads and stir-fry now towered six or seven feet. The chamomile had sprouted thickly and was bursting with buds.

Grasses blown in from the hills mingled with the purple and yellow bearded iris, euphorbia, and nasturtiums. For the next few months, I will labor weeding, weeding, and weeding. Inch by inch.

Despite the weeds, the garden has erupted into a colorful canvas of fragrant flowers. Lilac, wisteria, jasmine, mock orange, rose, and freesia compete for the title of most glorious blooms with the most intoxicating perfume.

It is time to plant my vegetables and herbs, and this is where I am starting small. In two containers outside the kitchen door, I bought and planted two tomato plants, a red bell pepper, shallots, scallions, basil, dill, and thyme.

In my vegetable garden, I started another artichoke, eggplant, squash, and lettuce. By purchasing four-inch pots and six-packs instead of gallons, I had the time, and the space, to get these in the soil immediately. In a vintage wheelbarrow, potatoes and onions are growing. Companion planting is a strategy that I implement to increase the success of my crops. To hungry insects and pests, the smell of onions is unpleasant, making them an excellent companion plant for many other vegetables including the members of the Solanaceae (nightshade) family of tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, and peppers. Onions also act as a mild aphid repellant to roses.

Here are other vegetables that will benefit from planting onions, garlic, or other alliums as companions:

Beets

Brassicas

Carrots

Chamomile

Dill

Lettuce

Parsnips

Parsley

Spinach

Strawberries

Don’t plant onions with asparagus, peas, beans, or sage as the flavor will be negatively affected and the growth of the plants will be stunted.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be able to finish weeding areas where I want to plant more tomatoes, zucchini, sweet corn, beans, and cucumbers. Check out the amount of weeds in this 10 x 10 space. Crazy amount of work, yet necessary.

Beans, corn, and zucchini I’ll plant by seed, and other vegetables I’ll buy in small containers. I will continue the succession seeding of beets, carrots, and greens that my family enjoys eating. I’ll add marigolds to repel other rodents and nematodes throughout the garden.

I am an advocate for growing my own groceries because I know that my soil is free of chemicals, insecticides, pesticides, and other harmful matter. You can also grow your own food even if you have a small space.

Whether you buy a decorative container or repurpose a vessel, sanitize it with bleach and water. Rinse well. Add pebbles for drainage and rich potting soil. Plant what you like to eat. Keep your pot watered. Feed with organic fertilizers based on the requirements of what you plant. You will have produce that is delicious, nutritious, and healthy.

Most people don’t know that many of the fruits and vegetables that we purchase in the supermarket or even at Farmer’s Markets are filled with chemicals. Even if you are on a strict budget, the following Dirty Dozen of vegetables and fruits should only be purchased as organic produce or grown in your garden. Sadly, these are vegetables and fruits that most people enjoy and believe are good for us. Beware…they are only good for you when they are grown without chemicals.

In order of the most chemicals used on each crop, The Dirty Dozen includes:

1.  strawberries

2.  spinach

3.  collard greens, kale, mustard greens

4.  peaches

5.  pears

6.  nectarines

7.  apples

8.  grapes

9.  peppers and hot peppers

10.  cherries

11.  blueberries

12.  green beans

A small amount of sweet corn, papaya, and squash is grown from genetically modified seeds. Always look to plant seeds that say “non-GMO”.

The following fruits and vegetables are called The Clean Fifteen. You may purchase them anywhere, yet again, what you grow yourself will always be more beneficial.

1.           avocado

2.           sweet corn

3.           pineapple

4.           onions

5.           papaya

6.           frozen sweet peas

7.           asparagus

8.           honeydew melon

9.           kiwi

10.        cabbage

11.        mushrooms

12.        mangoes

13.        sweet potatoes

14.        watermelon

15.        carrots

Finally, in May, plant annuals, perennials, and summer bulbs suited to your microclimate conditions as the weather warms. Cosmos, petunias, salvia, zinnias, yarrow, Agastache, penstemon, asters, marigolds, and echinacea are colorful choices that also attract pollinators.

Anemones and forget-me-notsFor bulbs, consider Lily of the Nile (Agapanthus), tuberous begonia, caladium, canna, dahlia, gladiolus, and lilies. Summer blooming plants need warm, well-draining soil. Don’t forget roses. They offer repeat blooms and fragrance for months. Always pay attention to the directions or plant tags. Keep everything watered sufficiently

Start small and increase as you have the time and space. Don’t buy too many plants at once if you won’t be able to get them in their forever home within a few days. Make sure your area is weeded well before you sow any seeds. Cut high grasses and remove debris around the perimeter of your house as fire prevention. Inch by inch, it’s a cinch!

Happy Gardening. Happy Growing!

Read: https://www.lamorindaweekly.com/archive/issue1706/Digging-Deep-with-Goddess-Gardener-Cynthia-Brian-Start-small.html

ü  PS: From May through June 30, DONATE your gently worn or new shoes to support women and families in poverty in developing countries as part of the Be the Star You Are!® charity Shoe Drive. Please tie shoes together or rubber band pairs to keep them together. Drop off at sponsor locations:

For more information, visit https://www.bethestaryouare.org/shoedrive

Raised in the vineyards of Napa County, Cynthia Brian is a New York Times best-selling author, actor, radio personality, speaker, media and writing coach as well as the Founder and Executive Director of Be the Star You Are!® 501 c3. Tune into Cynthia’s StarStyle® Radio Broadcast at www.StarStyleRadio.com. Her newest children’s picture book, No Barnyard Bullies, from the series, Stella Bella’s Barnyard Adventures is available now at https://www.CynthiaBrian.com/online-store. Hire Cynthia for writing projects, garden consults, and inspirational lectures. Cynthia@GoddessGardener.com

http://www.GoddessGardener.co

©2023 text and photos, Cynthia Brian. All rights reserved

Share

A Garden Journey through Eastern Europe

Posted by Cynthia Brian on
0
Empowerment
A Garden Journey through Eastern Europe

“Every spring is the only spring, a perpetual astonishment.” Ellis Peters

 

Subscribe now

My legs feel like jelly and my back is breaking. And the pain is not from gardening. It is from walking an average of ten miles per day on cobblestone streets, up steep hills, down into the woods of national parks, and climbing medieval stairs to fortresses and castles throughout my springtime journey to the former Eastern Bloc countries of Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, as well as Croatia and Serbia. Besides learning more about the history, culture, customs, people, and food, I was on a quest to identify the botanical specimens that we have in common.

The original weather reports indicated mild temperatures, but a cold front suddenly appeared broadcasting freezing winds, rain, snowfall, and overcast grey days. Locals blamed the meteorologic conditions on climate change and global warming. Yet Mother Nature earnestly wanted to birth spring in a magical awakening from its winter slumber. The rich soil of these European countries provides a foundation for a variety of plants and trees, many of which are familiar to Californians.

Each country has a special association with a specific flower. During the Ottoman conquest, tulips were brought to these countries and tulips were blooming profusely in every land. Hungary claims the tulip as its national flower.

Home to diverse wildflowers, including the Pasque flower, a harbinger of spring, Croatia calls the Dalmatian iris its own. The bright orange crown imperial flower was a specimen unknown to me.

The national symbol of Serbia is the plum tree, which was in full bloom throughout the country. Their national drink, Šljivovica, is made from plums.

In Romania a wild climbing rose called Rosa Canina is utilized for both health and drinking and the purple Carpathian crocus is the first sign of spring.

 

Bulgaria is the world’s leading producer of rose oil used in perfumes and cosmetic products. The roses were not yet in bloom, but the bushes were filled with buds. I was compelled to purchase rose oil which is supposedly excellent for skin revitalization.

The Czech Republic is home to a variety of spring- blooming flowers including crocus, tulips, and roses, and is known for its spectacular display of cherry blossom trees which create a stunning pink canopy over the cities and countryside.

Blooming tulip magnolia trees were in glorious abundance, adding beauty to the already spectacular architecture.

Bright yellow forsythia, called golden bells, was flowering throughout the region, along roads, in parks, and in forests. Forsythia is stoloniferous, which means when a branch meets the soil it takes root to start another bush.

Part of the Brassicaceae mustard and cabbage family, rapeseed/canola farms were ubiquitous as a prosperous and financially lucrative crop. The rapeseed oil is used for diesel fuel and other industrial processes and the edible variety produces canola oil. Many people have allergies to the flowers and don’t welcome the blanket of yellow blooms.

Living walls of exotic plants, many of which we use as houseplants, were featured in several hotels and restaurants in Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic. Apple, pear, and plum trees were in full blush throughout my sojourn, perfuming the chilly air.

I was surprised to see “lawns” consisting of dandelions, which were very attractive with their edible greens.

Pansies in a variety of colors and patterns dotted the landscapes. Another specimen for which I was unfamiliar was the butter yellow puff balls of the Kerria Japanese rose in Croatia.

Also unknown to me and quite intriguing was the Lunaria, called annual Honesty, dotting the hillsides in the Djerdap National Park in Serbia.

The Czech Republic enjoyed the most dramatic displays of horticultural bliss. The parks and squares were filled with blossoming European crabapples, tulip magnolias, and colorful tulips, as well as curated window boxes of colorful hyacinths, primroses, forget-me-nots, and other flowering bulbs.

My spring sojourn through Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic has been a time of great beauty, wonder, and education. From delicate wildflowers to bold and bright flowering trees, these countries offered a stunning array of blooms, despite the wintery weather.

 

It is with appreciation that I return to my gorgeous garden in full bloom albeit overgrown with weeds. May is a busy time in the garden, but with a little effort, we can keep our plants healthy and thriving. Follow these tips for gardening chores, and you’ll be well on your way to a beautiful landscape. With all the garden work ahead of me, I anticipate jelly legs and an aching back!

Spring is a perpetual astonishment and worth the pain.

 

Cynthia Brian’s Goddess Gardener May Gardening Guide

As the temperatures rise, our plants need more care and attention, so let’s get to work.

ü  WATER early in the morning as the weather warms to prevent evaporation.

ü  WEED constantly before weeds take over the garden. Remove the entire root system of weeds before sowing the seeds you want to grow.

ü  PLANT warm-season vegetables including tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, eggplant, zucchini, and whatever edibles your family enjoys eating.

 

ü  FERTILIZE your actively growing plants with a balanced fertilizer and follow the instructions carefully. Over-fertilizing can damage your plants, so don’t be tempted to add more than recommended.

ü  IMPROVE the biodiversity of your soil ecosystem through mulching and composting. Spring and fall are the ideal times to increase organic matter and humus content. Adding compost to your garden reduces the need for chemical fertilizers, and allows the soil to hold water well which means less watering.

ü  PICK up the last of the spent camellia blossoms from your garden to protect your plant for next season.

 

ü  SWEEP debris from driveways, walkways, steps, and porches to freshen up for spring.

ü  BRIGHTEN your curb appeal or plant window boxes with colorful annuals and perennials including petunias, zinnias, cleome, salvia, dahlias, snapdragons, primrose, bulbs, impatiens, and bachelor buttons.

ü  PREVENT pests. Keep an eye out for aphids, whiteflies, and other common garden pests. You can use organic pest control methods like neem oil or insecticidal soap to keep them under control.

ü  EMPTY standing water from pots, tires, neglected ponds, pools, or any place where mosquito larvae will breed. With all the rain we’ve had this year, mosquitoes could spread the West Nile virus and other diseases.

ü  CLEAR debris from your home and garden perimeter. Dried limbs, leaves, and weeds need to be removed. Fire season is upon us.

Digging Deep with Goddess Gardener, Cynthia Brian https://www.lamorindaweekly.com/archive/issue1705/Digging-Deep-with-Goddess-Gardener-Cynthia-Brian-Spring-sojourn.html

Raised in the vineyards of Napa County, Cynthia Brian is a New York Times best-selling author, actor, radio personality, speaker, media and writing coach as well as the Founder and Executive Director of Be the Star You Are!® 501 c3. Tune into Cynthia’s StarStyle® Radio Broadcast at www.StarStyleRadio.com. Her newest children’s picture book, No Barnyard Bullies, from the series, Stella Bella’s Barnyard Adventures is available now at https://www.CynthiaBrian.com/online-store. Hire Cynthia for writing projects, garden consults, and inspirational lectures. Cynthia@GoddessGardener.com For more information contact:

https://www.CynthiaBrian.com

Spring Spirit!

Posted by Cynthia Brian on
0
Empowerment
Spring Spirit!

 

By Cynthia Brian

StarStyle® Empowerment is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.

“On the first warm day of Spring, I dig my fingers deep into the soft earth. I

can feel its energy, and my spirit’s soar.” Helen Hayes

Do you feel the energy? Did you wake up one morning to witness most of the leaves on your deciduous trees unfurled? After our long, cold, rainy winter, the warmer weather you experience is a salve for your soul. Does your spirit soar when you say: “today is the day I will be digging in my garden?”

Share StarStyle® Empowerment

 

As cliché as it is, spring is the season of rebirth, renewal, and regeneration. Nowhere is this more evident than in the growth we experience in our gardens. The days will continue to get longer until the summer equinox, the air is refreshing, flowers and trees are in constant bloom, and we have a spring in our step. We feel younger and more alive. William Shakespeare in his wisdom wrote, “April hath put a spirit of youth in everything.”  William, you are so correct!

 

Spring is a magical time of year when we can finally get back into our gardens, plunge our fingers into the soil, and instead of planning, we begin planting! How therapeutic it is to scatter seeds, inhale the fresh air scented by the flowers, and be immersed in nature. As we stroll through our landscapes, we see what needs to be done and we also learn new things. Plants that have self-seeded are magically popping up in unexpected places. The sky-blue forget-me-nots remind me to remember and record what has happened and what will be happening in each plot.

 

Observe and interact with your plants. The emotional and mental benefits you will receive by immersing yourself in the wonders of nature will reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and improve your overall mental health. As you wander in your yard, plaster your face with a big smile.  Lose track of time as you engage with the nurturing of seedlings in this new reborn growing season.

Feel the satisfaction of watching your tulip bulbs grow into gorgeous, cupped flowers, the pride in picking a bouquet of peonies to display, and the joy in knowing that by summer, you will be harvesting nutritious vegetables cultivated by you. If there are children or grandchildren in your vicinity, provide them with seeds to sow their favorite vegetables or fruits. They will be amazed at the course of nature, and how something so tiny as a seed can mature into something edible and delectable.

 

Watch birds building nests. Listen to the frogs croaking their mating calls as they emerge from slumber. Feel the velvety softness of lamb’s ear and stick your nose into a fragrant hyacinth blossom. Spirits will be lifted in countless ways and you will be rejuvenated and revitalized.

Is there any better way to welcome spring than by getting your hands dirty and reconnecting with Mother Earth?

 

Happy Gardening. Happy Growing. Happy Springtime!

The Goddess Gardner’s Gardening Guide for April

AMEND your soil before you begin sowing. Soil is the foundation of your garden. Rich compost will help with adding the nutrients your plants will need to thrive.

CLEAN and sharpen your garden tools by plunging them in a five-gallon bucket of sand mixed with a cup of vegetable oil. The sand will keep them sharper and the oil wards off the rust. Small hand tools can be stored in the sand bucket.

BUILD or buy raised beds lined with wire to make gardening easier on your back as well as protected from digging predators like gophers and rats. Fill with a combination of mulch, compost, and soil.

 

CONSIDER implementing permeable pavers on a patio for increased water capturing that will support your landscape.

PLANT frost tender plants as the weather warms towards the end of the month. Ground covers, citrus, bougainvillea, and summer annuals including begonia, lobelia, snapdragon, cosmos, and primrose are available for purchase.

SUPPORT peonies or other tall plants that are flopping with a tomato cage!

 

EXCHANGE rhizomes, bulbs, and seeds with fellow gardeners for a variety of selections.

SOW seeds of scarlet runner bean, sweet peas, star jasmine, or morning glories to climb on fences and wire.

CREATE a palette of striking performance with the many shapes, sizes, textures, and colors of drought-tolerant succulents which require minimal moisture.

 

ENJOY a successive parade of patterns and painted brushstrokes throughout the seasons by planting plants with complimentary hues and consecutive blooming times.

SCRUB your barbecue grill with white vinegar then scrub with half an onion to clean the grates and get ready for outside dining.

COMBINE ornamental and edible plants to create a cottage garden. Make sure your interior design and exterior esthetics flow like water.

RESIST cutting back the dying leaves of narcissi and daffodils. The fronds are gathering their nutrition for next year’s blooms. Cut them back only when as dry as potato chips.

 

CONTROL snails and slugs with non-toxic Sluggo, pick them off by hand, use copper barriers, or bowls of beer. These slimy gastropods hatching now will devour new seedlings.

BUY ladybugs from your nursery or garden center if you see aphids, mealybugs, or other pests on your plants. Remember ladybugs fly to infested gardens.

VISIT the Be the Star You Are!® booth at the Moraga Faire on Saturday, April 29th between 11-4pm to pick up a bag of complimentary spring potpourri and have your kids plant seeds in our craft area. Bring your gardening questions and I’ll be there to answer them. www.BetheStarYouAre.org/events

 

Raised in the vineyards of Napa County, Cynthia Brian is a New York Times best-selling author, actor, radio personality, speaker, media and writing coach as well as the Founder and Executive Director of Be the Star You Are!® 501 c3. Tune into Cynthia’s StarStyle® Radio Broadcast at www.StarStyleRadio.com. Her newest children’s picture book, No Barnyard Bullies, from the series, Stella Bella’s Barnyard Adventures is available now at https://www.CynthiaBrian.com/online-store. Hire Cynthia for writing projects, garden consults, and inspirational lectures. Cynthia@GoddessGardener.com

http://www.GoddessGardener.com

Share StarStyle® Empowerment

 

 

How To Protect Your Winter Garden – Dos And Don’ts

Posted by rstapholz on
0
Health & Wellness
How To Protect Your Winter Garden – Dos And Don’ts

One of the most common winter gardening questions that people ask is whether significant temperature changes may hurt or kill decorative plants.

In most cases, the answer is no. Plants have the genetic ability to detect and adapt to changes in the environment. While warm winter temperatures promote development and blooming, chilly temperatures limit growth and hasten to blossom.

Plants are especially sensitive in the spring; when there are prolonged periods of warm temperatures and then out of the blue, there are nights with low temperatures well below freezing. According to the Property Buying Company a well groomed garden is a highly sought after feature.

Tips For Protecting Flowering Plants In Winter

While most plants can withstand harsh winter freezes, flowers on winter-flowering plants such as plum, camellias, cherry trees, and azaleas are not so lucky.

An extreme freeze can destroy swollen buds that are about to blossom. The damage may go undetected until the flowers open, at which point the damage will manifest as brown patches on the petals. In some instances, the entire bud may freeze and fall off the plant. Flowers that have fully opened will either transform into a sickly brown or drop to the ground.

Cover plants with buds or open blooms using an old sheet or a commercially supplied frost cover to prevent being disappointed by unattractive blossoms or losing them entirely.

Pro tip: Avoid using plastic since it can rapidly generate an oven effect when exposed to sunlight.

You may even fool Mother Nature by clipping the buds ahead of the freeze and taking them indoors to let them bloom. There is no need to put a protective covering if a freeze is anticipated before buds have formed.

Here is a list of dos and don’ts to make sure your plants withstand severe freezes so you can enjoy the blossoms of the many lovely winter-flowering plants according to invasive plant experts at Environet.

Winter Garden Dos

  • Don’t stop planting – provided the ground is soft for digging.
  • Mulch is your friend. It will aid in maintaining steady root temperatures.
  • Make use of compost. It enriches the soil with organic nutrients. Just make sure not to add more than three inches thick.
  • Don’t forget to water your plants. Watering ahead of a forecasted freeze helps plants, particularly annuals and potted plants, to survive a harsh freeze. Proactive hydrating allows plants to absorb moisture before the ground freezes, preventing water from reaching the root zone. Remember to water above-ground shoots and the roots.
  • Provide additional protection for potted plants. Cover them with frost cloth or other heat-retaining blankets, and place pots and other containers beneath the eaves or near the foundation of your house.
  • Take houseplants indoors. To get rid of hitchhiking creatures, thoroughly water the plants with an insecticidal drench and spray all sides of the leaves with an insecticidal soap that is safe for people and pets. Place plants inside in areas where they will be exposed to indirect, strong sunlight for at least five hours every day. As most houseplants do not actively develop in the winter, make sure you position them away from heating vents and drafts and hydrate them sparingly.

Winter Garden Don’ts

  • Fertilize. Winter is a time for garden plants to rest and go dormant. Forcing plants to initiate new growth before the earth warms in the spring not only disrupts their rejuvenation time, but freezing temperatures, ice storms, or even strong frosts may destroy sensitive new growth.
  • Skip your normal watering cycle. A once-a-week thorough watering will suffice during dry months when the ground is not frozen or covered with snow. Sufficient watering is especially important for new plantings.
  • Be concerned about bulb foliage. Daffodil leaves and other spring-flowering bulbs should be alright during temperature drops.

Born to Be Wild

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
Born to Be Wild

Cynthia-Glacier-solheimajokull, katla geopark.jpg

“All journeys have secret destinations 

of which the traveler is unaware.”

~Martin Buber

Volcanoes, glaciers, highlands, prairies, lava flows, fire, ice. Nature untouched and untamed.

Iceland.

Blue Lagoon, Iceland.jpg

Resting on the boundary where the North American and Eurasian Tectonic plates meet, Iceland is a country of intense volcanic eruptions, boiling hot springs, rushing rivers, venting steam, spouting geysers, powerful waterfalls, ice caves, aqua blue lagoons, northern lights, and minimal sunshine. With a population of only 338,378 and a median age of 38, most people live in the capital of Reykjavik. Iceland, a country of fierce contrasts, is geared for the rugged and the youthful.

lavaformations-plants.jpg

I visited this wild, wild country recently during the season of “the midnight sun”” when darkness never comes and sleep is elusive. Twilight reigned supreme allowing for plenty of exploring and hiking adventures. Summer in Iceland was freezing cold with unpredictable blustery North Atlantic weather, gray skies, menacing clouds, bone-chilling rain, and gusty winds. Sunshine in any minimal amount was not on the agenda. My daily wardrobe included gloves, faux fur hat, layers of clothing, double mufflers, boots, and a warm raincoat. Naturally, a bathing suit was always packed in my bag for that daily dip in a “secret” hot springs lagoon where the natives and visitors come to warm up.

Cynthia-skogafoss waterfall, katla deopark, iceland.jpg

As a traveler who dives into the culture of a nation, I wanted to indulge in the Icelandic cuisine. To supply fresh vegetables, hothouses operate year round using geothermal energy providing tasty and nutritious veggies to augment a diet of fish and meat. Dining out is expensive. The average price for a green salad was thirty dollars. Everything I ordered at authentic local restaurants was unique and delicious with the exception of fermented shark which was the most disgusting, foul smelling, horrid tasting item I’ve ever experienced. I spent a full day sick to my stomach after just a few nauseating bites, yet this is considered an Icelandic winter staple.

4-wheeler, field of buttercups.jpg

What interested me most was the ever-changing unique landscape on this small isle bordering the Arctic Circle. I was mesmerized by the plethora of wildflowers, grasses, and moss carpeting the island. Flowers sprouted in the cracks of lava flows, spilled down the sides of volcanoes, and grew on the edges of the glaciers. While riding Icelandic horses ( a small sturdy breed endemic to Iceland only) through the countryside, miles and miles of blue lupines filled the fields as far as the eye could see. In the 1950s seeds from Alaskan lupines were scattered in a few regions of Iceland to help with erosion and soil improvement. They have now naturalized, much to the delight of visitors and the chagrin of the populace who have denoted lupines as invasive weeds that crowd out indigenous plants and stunt the growth of hungry sheep. Acres of buttercups, wild perennial sweet pea, angelica, mustard, hawkweed, lady smock, Arctic sea rocket, meadowsweet, wild strawberry, gentian, Lady’s mantle, marsh marigold, cornflower, yarrow, violets, and Iceland poppy hugged the ground. The dandelions grew to almost two feet tall and are harvested as a nourishing edible. Lichen and moss covered the fields of lava. The treasured Icelandic moss is said to be so delicate that a single footprint will take a hundred years to regenerate. iceland moss.jpg

iceland lupins.jpg

Autumn is an auspicious time to sow wildflower seeds in America. What makes a flower a wildflower? Basically, wildflowers grow happily without any human cultivation. they live and thrive within an interactive plant community. Many wildflowers are native to a certain region and when they freely reproduce in another area, they have naturalized.

Gullfoss Watrfall-Golden Circle.jpg

If you’d like to introduce wildflowers into your landscape, decide on the species you want and buy seeds from a trusted company. Make sure the plants are not an invasive species. (You can always check the USDA plant database at https://plants.usda.gov/java/)

angelica near a river:volcano, icleand.jpg

Sow seeds directly into the ground or into containers. Make sure seeds are protected from winter chills and marauding birds.

Here’s my list of beautiful wildflowers that will easily domesticate:

Blackeyed Susans (Rudbeckia)

Bluebells (Mertensia virginica)

Buttercups

California Poppy

Columbine (Aquilegia)

Coneflowers (Echinacea)

Coreopsis

Lupines

Mustard

Penstemons

Wild perennial sweet pea

Yarrow

If flowers can flourish in the extreme climate of Iceland, they will go wild in our temperate gardens. Create secret destinations that are born to be wild!

wildflowers,iceland.jpg

“Wild thing.

You make my heart sing.

You make everything.

Groovy!

Wild Thing

I think I love you.” The Troggs

lava.jpg

Happy Gardening. Happy Growing.

Read more: https://www.lamorindaweekly.com/archive/issue1216/Cynthia-Brians-Gardening-Guide-for-October-Born-to-be-wild.html

Cynthia Brian

Cynthia Brian, The Goddess Gardener, raised in the vineyards of Napa County, is a New York Times best-selling author, actor, radio personality, speaker, media and writing coach as well as the Founder and Executive Director of Be the Star You Are1® 501 c3. 

Tune into Cynthia’s Radio show and order her books at www.StarStyleRadio.com.

Buy a copy of her new books, Growing with the Goddess Gardener and Be the Star You Are! Millennials to Boomers at www.cynthiabrian.com/online-store

Available for hire for projects and lectures.

Cynthia@GoddessGardener.com

www.GoddessGardener.com

Cynthia Brian'Growing with the Goddess Gardener book.jpg

The Gratitude Hour

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
The Gratitude Hour

Happy thanksgiving 3.jpg

Thanksgiving comes only once a year yet gratitude needs to be a way of living daily. With the utter political chaos, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and other tragedies throughout the year, everyone needs to be grateful to be celebrating the feast of the pilgrims with the Native Americans.

Fall hedgehog.jpeg

Cynthia Brian hosts an hour filled with inspirational insights, autumn gardening tips, suggestions for creating a gratitude journal, ideas on planning a perfect Thanksgiving feast, and even guidelines for shopping on Black Friday or Cyber Monday.

arrangmenet-roses-mums-pistache berries.jpg coleus-begonias-fall.jpg

Tune in and count your blessings with the Goddess Gardener.

happy thanksgiving 4.jpg

Be the Star You Are!® charity continues Operation Disaster Relief Program for fires and hurricanes throughout the holidays. Visit and donate to help: http://www.bethestaryouare.org/copy-of-operation-hurricane-disaste

 

Listen at Voice America: https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/103330/the-gratitude-hour

The Holiday Season Begins. SHOP and GIVE while SAVING

1. AmazonSmile donates .5% of purchases http://smile.amazon.com/ch/94-3333882

2. Discounted books at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/shops/be_the_star_you_are_charity

Amazon Smile klogo.jpg

3. Buy or Sell on EBAY:http://givingworks.ebay.com/charity-auctions/charity/be-the-star-you-are-501-c-3/1504/?favorite=link

ebay logo.jpg

4. Use GoodSearch to search the web & buy from your favorite stores,. Choose Be the Star You Are as your charity to support. You can log in with Facebook, too! http://www.goodsearch.com/goodto-go/be-the-star-you-are

 

5. Shop at over 1300 stores on IGIVE: http://www.iGive.com/BTSYA

6. BTSYA Logo Store: http://btsya.rylees.net

7. Giving Assistant: Shop. Earn. Give! Use Giving Assistant to earn cash back at 1800+ popular online stores, then donate a percentage to BTSYA: https://givingassistant.org/np#be-the-star-you-are-inc

8. Designer Clothes to Buy or Sell: https://www.unionandfifth.com/charities/be-the-star-you-are-moraga-ca/shop

If you would like to make a direct donation to our giving fund, please visit our Paypal page! https://www.paypal.com/us/webapps/mpp/search-cause?charityId=1504&s=3

2017 TOP RATD NONPROFIT.jpgHappy Autumn.jpg

Hanging Baskets, House Noise Alerts, DIY Security Systems

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
Hanging Baskets, House Noise Alerts, DIY Security Systems

air balloning over temecula (1).jpg

From the vineyards of Temecula in Southern California to the coastline towns on the Oregon coast, everywhere Cynthia Brian travel has witnessed glorious displays of cascading flowers. Hanging from pergolas, lampposts, balconies, porches, and patios, these bloom filled tubs trump the fern and Spider plant baskets of by-gone days. The prolific blooms of petunias, fuchsias, impatiens, and verbena extend the flowering season with a myriad of bright colors in purple, pink, white, blue, and yellow. Learn how to make a glorious hanging masterpiece.

fuschias and impatiens hanging.jpg

Do you know what all the creaks and noises of your house indicate? You don’t have ghosts but you may have structural issues that need attention. Find out which sounds you need to pay attention to ensure your safety.

 

About 20% of homes have security systems that are monitored and professionally installed. But a new type of DIY security system has emerged with no additional fees beyond the cost of the equipment and no professional monitoring. Instead of requiring wires in the walls, DIY systems typically use the existing Wi-Fi network in your home and you can install one yourself!

 

Listen at Voice America Network: https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/102944/hanging-baskets-house-noise-alerts-diy-security-systems

pink-purple hanging basket.jpg

Be the Star You Are!® is collecting donations to help with Operation Hurricane and Fire Disaster Relief. http://www.bethestaryouare.org/copy-of-operation-hurricane-disaste

fire-napa.jpg

#StartWithaSmile at smile.amazon.com/ch/94-3333882 and Amazon donates to Be The Star You Are, Inc..

Make a DONATION through PAYPAL GIVING FUND and PAYPAL with 100% going to BTSYA with NO FEES https://www.paypal.com/us/webapps/mpp/search-cause?charityId=1504&s=3

BTSYA Button.jpg

Shop. Earn. Give! Use Giving Assistant to earn cash back at 1800+ popular online stores, then donate a percentage to BTSYA: https://givingassistant.org/np#be-the-star-you-are-inc

Catch up with all broadcasts on ITunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/starstyle-be-the-star-you-are!/id669630180?mt=2

Buy books by Cynthia Brian at http://www.starstyleradio.com/store

Cyn books 2.jpg

For photos, descriptions, links, archives, and more, visit http://www.StarStyleRadio.com.

Get inspired, motivated, and informed with StarStyle®-Be the Star You Are!®

Lend us Your Ears!!!

Pre-order Cynthia Brian’s newest book, Growing with the Goddess Gardener and receive lots of freebies! http://www.cynthiabrian.com/online-store

front cover-Growing with the goddess gardener book copy.jpg

Transforming the world through Flowers! By Beth Bell

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
Transforming the world through Flowers! By Beth Bell

Flower Alchemist, Katie Hess, & Flower Whisperer, Beth Bell come together on The  Beth Bell Radio Show to talk about how flowers can impact our lives in ways you may not expect.  The Power of Flowers are speaking to our souls in a new evolution and revolution that can shift and transform us. Energy, frequencies and vibrations are all part of the magic of Mother Nature when it comes to flower elixirs + essences.  Learn how the special formulations created by Katie Hess, founder of LotusWei can evoke the precise feelings you want to experience.  There’s 15+ years of study and observation behind the products — and the effects are nothing short of miraculous. In her book Flower Evolution you’ll learn about the magic properties of flowers and experience incredible photographs taken by Louie Shwartzberg who’s the founder of Moving Art.  Listen in and hear how you can blossom your bliss and bloom into your full potential.

More Here!

Creating Your Space, Chanda Hahn with Lost Girl, Spring Sprung By Cynthia Brian

Posted by Editor on
0
Empowerment
Creating Your Space, Chanda Hahn with Lost Girl, Spring Sprung By Cynthia Brian


If you are looking for upbeat, life-changing, and mind stretching information, you’ve come to the right place. Host Cynthia Brian takes you on a journey of exploration that will encourage, inspire, and motivate you to make positive changes that offer life enhancing results. It’s party time on StarStyle®-Be the Star You Are!®. And YOU are invited! Join us LIVE 4-5pm Pt on Wednesdays or tune in to the archives at your leisure. Come play in StarStyle Country.

Do you feel cramped in your relationship because you don’t have a space or place of your own? To be at peace and enjoy harmony everyone needs personal space, emotionally and physically. Find out how to carve that niche for yourself.

If you loved Peter Pan, you’ll love New York Times best selling author Chanda Hahn’s novel, Lost Girl. Wendy doesn’t remember anything about Neverland and Peter just wants to forget. A fun read from the first book of the Neverwood Chronicles will have you anxious to know more with the following novel, Lost Boy.

Spring has sprung and with it the trees, shrubs, bulbs, and perennials are in full bloom. You may be suffering from allergies from the pollen, yet the beauty of the season is enchanting. What chores can you do in your garden? The Goddess Gardener, Cynthia Brian, shovels the dirt.


Guest Bio:
Chanda Hahn is a New York Times & USA Today Bestselling author of Reign An Unfortunate Fairy Tale. She uses her experience as a children’s pastor, children’s librarian and bookseller to write compelling and popular fiction for teens. She was born in Seattle, WA, grew up in Nebraska and currently resides in Portland, Oregon with her husband and their twin children. www.Chandahahn.com

Listen at Voice America, Empowerment Channel 

#StartWithaSmile at smile.amazon.com/ch/94-3333882 . Amazon donates to Be The Star You Are, Inc..

Read our BTSYA March Newsletter

What’s happening? Want to party? Visit our Event page 

Make a DONATION through PAYPAL GIVING FUND

Catch up with all broadcasts on ITunes

Buy books by Cynthia Brian at http://starstyleradio.net/Store.html

For photos, descriptions, links, archives, and more, visit http://www.StarStyleRadio.com.
Get inspired, motivated, and informed with StarStyle®-Be the Star You Are!®
Lend us Your Ears!!!

Make a donation today to Be the Star You Are!® charity http://www.bethestaryouare.org

Cynthia Brian talks about the empowering outreach programs offered by Be the Star You Are!® charity. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHglz05pBvI&feature=youtu.be

Embed StarStyle® Be the Star You Are!® Radio
If you are a fan of the authors, experts, celebrities, and guests that appear regularly on StarStyle®-Be the Star You Are!® radio, you can now be sure to never miss an episode. Embed this code into your WordPress site or any site and you’ll always have Cynthia Brian, Heather Brittany, and all of your favorite pioneers on the planet at your fingertips.  Upbeat, positive, life-changing talk radio broadcasting live each week since 1998. Lend us Your Ears. We are Starstyle®-Be the Star You Are!®
http://www.voiceamerica.com/jwplayer/HostPlayer.html?showid=2206

Be the Star You Are!® charity. Every Season is for Giving Make a donation today. http://www.bethestaryouare.org/donate.htm

Links you can use for Be the Star You Are!®
Positive Results
About Us 
Programs 
How to Help 
Blog
Events
Contact us

Feminism Today By Cynthia Brian

Posted by Editor on
0
Categories
Feminism Today By Cynthia Brian

 

Teens talk and the world listens every Tuesday NOON PT on the Voice America Kids Network. Produced by StarStyler® Productions, LLC and Cynthia Brian, these young adults know how to rock and express their unique views. Join the fun!

Asya Gonzalez, 2016JPGZahra HasanianChela Pelchat – Version 2
What is feminism? Does it refer to a diverse variety of beliefs, ideas, movements, and agendas for action? Hosts Asya Gonzalez and Zahra Hasanian share their views on gender equality, the roles of parents in our shaping our viewpoints, and the importance of being true to yourself. Past Present Reporter Chelsea Pelchat gives us a historical perspective as she talks about history and society’s outlook on women through the ages, as well as their place in shaping our modern world. Best selling author and producer, Cynthia Brian, prefers to include both men and women in this narrative as we are all humans in training. Instead of employing labels, how about empowering one another to greatness regardless of gender, race, religion, politics, or other biases? Perhaps once we do that, we won’t need ‘isms!
Cynthia Brian-side
Guest Bio: Cynthia Brian, Founder and Executive Director of Be the Star You Are!® 501 c3 literacy and positive media charity, New York Times best selling co-author of Chicken Soup for the Gardener’s Soul, author of Be the Star You Are!®, 99 Gifts for Living, Loving, Laughing, and Learning to Make a Difference, Be the Star You Are!® for TEENS, The Business of Show Business, The Blessing of Love and Relationships, and Miracle Moments®, is an internationally acclaimed key note speaker, personal growth consultant, actor, producer and host of radio and TV shows, columnist, designer, gardener, and lifestyle coach. She was raised on a farm by two parents who loved one another and believe that men and women were equals in every way. Cynthia has lived with the mentality that anything is possible as long as a person is willing to work hard, show up, and be true to herself. The stars are limitless. (http://www.CynthiaBrian.com)

Listen at Voice America Kids Network

#StartWithaSmile at smile.amazon.com/ch/94-3333882 to stock up for Christmas/Hannukah and Amazon donates to Be The Star You Are, Inc..

Make a DONATION through PAYPAL GIVING FUND and PAYPAL with 100% going to BTSYA with NO FEES
#Stand For Literacy

Read our BTSYA February Newsletter

What’s happening? Want to party? Visit our Event page 

Make a DONATION through PAYPAL GIVING FUND 

Help Be the Star You Are!® without spending a penny. If you’ve ever purchased a TV or computer screen, just 3 minutes of your time is needed to fill out the simple form and click submit. Every unit qualifies for a donation of about $20 to Be the Star You Are!®. You will receive a tax receipt once the donations have been dispersed. PLEASE do this today. Thanks from Be the Star You Are!®
 
Read about our SUCCESSFUL VOLUNTEERS: READ AT PRESS PASS
Catch up with all broadcasts on ITunes
Buy books by Cynthia Brian  
Amazon Store 
Express Yourself! Teen Radio is produced by Cynthia Brian of Starstyle Productions, llc as an outreach program of Be the Star You Are! charity. To make a tax-deductible donation to keep this positive youth programming broadcasting weekly to international audiences, visit http://www.bethestaryouare.org/donate.htm. Dare to care!

For all the latest news on what teens are talking about on Express Yourself! Teen Radio embed this code into your blogs and web sites <Iframe src=”http://www.voiceamerica.com/jwplayer/HostPlayer.html?showid=2014″frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”auto” width=”420″ height=”380″></Iframe>
Thanks for supporting teens!

Make a donation today to Be the Star You Are!® charity
Cynthia Brian talks about the empowering outreach programs offered by Be the Star You Are!® charity.  

Embed StarStyle® Be the Star You Are!® Radio
If you are a fan of the authors, experts, celebrities, and guests that appear regularly on StarStyle®-Be the Star You Are!® radio, you can now be sure to never miss an episode. Embed this code into your WordPress site or any site and you’ll always have Cynthia Brian, Heather Brittany, and all of your favorite pioneers on the planet at your fingertips.  Upbeat, positive, life-changing talk radio broadcasting live each week since 1998. Lend us Your Ears. We are Starstyle®-Be the Star You Are!®
 
Be the Star You Are!® charity. Every Season is for Giving Make a donation today.

Links you can use for Be the Star You Are!®
Positive Results
About Us 
Programs 
How to Help 
Blog
Events
Contact us

What’s happening? Want to party? Visit our Event page 

Talk 2

Starstyle, Be the Star You Are, and Miracle Moments are registered trademarks of Cynthia Brian

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)

RSS
Follow by Email