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The Upright Zone

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Empowerment
The Upright Zone

The Upright Zone

When I first conceived of this article, I thought it was going to be primarily about what I had noticed about how my body behaves while walking. Now I see the observations I want to share go much deeper. So let’s begin with the simple version of this article and go from there.

In early 2018 while in Costa Rica, where Shya and I were facilitating our immersion courses in leadership, communication and well-being, I experienced something I now call the “Upright Zone.” Here’s what happened:

One morning, as we took a walk before breakfast, I was a bit stiff – my stride shorter than usual, one of my hamstrings achy. Shya wasn’t feeling particularly spry either, but as usual, we set off on our morning jaunt as though it were our idea (which it was) and made a point to walk with alacrity – an excellent way to bypass those “I don’t wanna” thoughts. Shya and I were patient with ourselves about our pace but at the same time we engaged in the moment, moving as if we were fully alive, not as if we were hardly awake. As we did so, our legs began to swing freer, our stride became longer and naturally, without effort, we began to walk at a lively pace.

On this particular morning, we headed down past the resort office into the gravel parking area, past the geese in the pond and over the suspension bridge. Continuing down the drive about a half-mile to the entrance of the property, we lightly tapped the bars of the gate and reversed course. As we walked, I enjoyed the sky lightening, with wisps of peach clouds turning golden as the sun rose off the horizon. We delighted in the flowers, the play of light on large green leaves and the flash of brilliant red set in midnight black on a scarlet-rumped tanager.

After we reached the end of the drive and had started back toward the resort, I noticed a phenomenon I had felt before but this time it was quite perceptible. As I walked, my belly spontaneously pulled in of its own accord and I found myself taller, in a surprisingly upright posture. I don’t tend to walk with my stomach distended so it was notable to me that my core muscles fully engaged themselves, much like I have purposefully drawn them in while doing Pilates or other exercise discipline. From this state I found myself feeling well and empowered, not only in my body but also in spirit. After describing the sensation to Shya that morning, I started to think of this state as my own personal “Upright Zone.”

I like that tall feeling. I enjoy moving through time and space as if I am not going anywhere yet I am fully engaged, alive and present. I take pleasure in striding forward while moving with ease. And it’s delightful to get a core muscle workout without trying.

On our Costa Rica morning walks Shya and I step out of our door and trick our bodies into action whether they felt like it or not. Tired, awake, it doesn’t matter, we play the fake-it-till-you-make-it school of full engagement until our bodies took over and it required no further effort on our part to keep in motion.

So, originally that was my point and the end of the story. Yet, I was surprised to find the Upright Zone late one night while on a subsequent trip to Oregon to visit my aging parents.

It was now late 2018 and just before Shya and I flew to Oregon, my then 92 year-old father had an emergency operation to remove a large kidney stone. Luckily my two sisters were able to be there to support him and my 93 year-old mom. My dad has such severe dementia, he didn’t grasp he was in the hospital, much less that he’d had an operation.

When we arrived in Oregon, Dad had just come home and everyone was exhausted. But then there were complications. He got nighttime diarrhea, which required helping him make multiple changes of clothes at night. On the second night of his illness, it was my turn to sleep nearby and be on call for the evening challenges. First at 11pm, and then again at 2:30, I was awakened to help him in the bathroom. Each time I needed to clean him up, change his clothes, then mop and sterilize the area. Then at 4:15am when he was sick once again, an amazing thing happened – I suddenly entered the Upright Zone.

As I was walking down the hall in those wee hours of the morning, in an instant, I found myself fully engaged – body, mind and spirit. The Upright Zone took over and between one step and the next I was tall and powerful, meeting this situation as if it were my idea, my preference – striding as if I was looking forward to what lay ahead.

As I rounded the corner into the bathroom, I recalled a saying I’ve heard from people in times of hardship or stress, “Just suck it up!” But that adage has always implied pain and suffering and working to overcome being a victim. I realized that I was experiencing a transformational version of sucking it up – no pain, no being a victim, just strength. The Upright Zone occurred naturally rather than following a self-imposed dictate to get over the moment and get on with it – whatever that odious “it” may be.

I’m grateful that I am a player of the game of full engagement, even in the times when life seems simple and undemanding. It has made things so much easier during life’s challenges and when circumstances become potentially stressful.

Since 1987, internationally acclaimed authors, seminar leaders, podcast/radio show hosts and business consultants Ariel and Shya Kane have acted as guides, leading people through the swamp of the mind into the clarity and brilliance of the moment. Find out more about the Kanes, their seminars in NYC, Germany and Costa Rica, the Say YES to Your Life! Meetups their work has inspired, their Being Here podcast or join their email newsletter. Also get information about their award-winning books. Their newest book, Being Here…Too, is available on Amazon.comBarnesandNoble.com and everywhere books are sold.

Books by Ariel & Shya Kane

The Eldercare Advocate: A Calmer You; A Path to A Healthier You

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Empowerment
The Eldercare Advocate: A Calmer You; A Path to A Healthier You

A calmer mind can help you respond to stressful situations in a way that is less harmful to your body. There is even research which indicates that the stress one experiences may play a role in one’s hair turning gray

There is evidentiary research that becoming calmer and achieving inner peace has powerful benefits on overall health and wellness. There are many ways and practices to help on the path to achieving an improved level of calm but one of the simplest is breathing.

Breathing is an autonomic nervous system response that is controlled by the respiratory center in an area at the base of the brain. We do not have to consciously control our breathing; it is an involuntary function. However, that doesn’t mean we don’t have the ability to control it. We actually CAN control our breathing. In doing so we can use it as a valuable tool to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety which in turn can help us feel more calm. Thus, breathing exercises can be beneficial to your mental and physical wellbeing.

There are even those that believe that merely being around a person who has achieved inner peace can have a positive impact on their own mood or level of calm. This is reflected in the statement: “the tension was so thick you can cut it with a knife”. This implies that that one is able to feel the tension in the environment which can cause a heightened response in our own body and influence our behavior. Thus, it stands to reason, that being around a person who is more calm can help inspire a feeling of calm within ourselves.

There are a variety of breathing techniques that you can practice to help you achieve a greater feeling of inner calm or peace.

1.  Abdominal or diaphragmatic breathing is the basis of all breathing exercises. Did you ever notice that when a baby sleeps their abdomen moves up and down? Did you ever notice that when you are laying down, in the most relaxed position, when you breathe your abdomen goes up and down.This is because this is how the body’s optimal brething functioning. It is the deepest form of breathing, when the most breath completely fills our lungs and every cell in our body becomes oxygenated.

To begin, sit down in a comfortable position, put one hand on your chest and the other on your belly. Take a deep breath in through your nose. If done correctly the diaphragm will inflates fully so that air goes to completely fill the our triangle shaped lungs all the way to their base. The breath should push the hand on the stomach out, while the other hand on the chest does not move. Try setting aside time 10 minutes each day to using this technique to take six to ten slow, deep breaths per minute for approximately ten minutes. You may experience immediate benefits such as a reduced heart rate and/or blood pressure level. After regularly practicing this for six to eight weeks you may see other advantages. This technique can beneficial if utilized prior to stress causing events.

2.  A Basic Calming Breath involves initially taking a long, slow breath in through your nose, first filling your lower lungs, then your upper lungs, holding the breath for a count of “three” and then slowly exhaling through pursed lips while you simultaneously think about relaxing the muscles of your face, jaw, shoulders and stomach.

3.  Dr. Andrew Weil, the founder and director of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, is a proponent of the 4-7-8 breathing technique also known as “relaxing breath”. The technique is as follows: breathe in for 4 seconds, hold your breath for 7 seconds and exhale for 8 seconds. Focusing on long deep controlled breaths in a specific rhythm is also a core practice of many meditation and yoga practices which also promote relaxation. The scientific evidence supporting this technique is limited; however, individual people have reported that achieving this type of rhythmic breathing has helped them reduce anxiety thereby creating a sense of relaxation which leads to sleep. Achieving an inner calm obviously helps us in reducing our anger responses as well. How many times have we heard the expression “count to 10’ before we respond. This is meant to serve the same purpose. Paired with purposeful, controlled breathing, this can go a long way to helping us achieve inner calm and respond more favorably to a variety of challenging situations that we all face whether in our personal or work lives/environments.

4.  Alternate Nostril breathing is a yogic practice of breath control which has been demonstrated to be beneficial. In 2016, Vogue magazine declared “Breathing Is the New Yoga”, which is the primary technique in the Art of Living’s Happiness Program known as Sudarshan Kriya which we know as meditation. There are over 65 independent studies which show that Sudarshan Kriya is effective in reducing levels of the stress hormone cortisol, increases mental focus, enhances levels of immunity and decreases depression and anxiety, with quick and lasting effects.

In Sanskrit, Alternate Nostril Breathing is called Nadi Shodhana Pranayama, which translated means “subtle energy clearing breathing technique”. Alternate Nostril Breathing helps calm the mind, reduce anxiety, and bring a feeling of relaxation to the entire body. If performed for just a few minutes, Alternate Nostril Breathing can instantly reduce stress and fatigue, but can also be used to reduce stress before high-stress situations such as job interviews, performances or public speaking events. Some people describe the burst of energy they feel from alternate nostril breathing as similar to the jolt they get after drinking a cup of coffee. This can help you achieve a heightened sense of awareness or help you to be more focused.

Though alternate nostril breathing can be done as part of or is integral to it can also be done as its own practice to help quiet and still your mind. This technique may be helpful for caregivers who can use it to help manage the stresses that often accompany being in that role. You may also find that practicing alternate nostril breathing helps you to be more mindful of the present moment.

An overview of the procedure:

·  Sit in a comfortable position with the spine long and the hips relaxed. Release any tension from your jaw. Close your eyes.

·  Take a deep breath in

·  On an exhalation, take your index finger and close the right nostril and breathe out through the left nostril.

·  Then without moving your finger, breathe in through the left nostril.

·  Then release that finger and take your opposite hand and use your index finger to close the left nostril.

·  Then breathe out through the right nostril.

·  Then Inhale through the right nostril. Release the finger on your left nostril, close the right nostril with your index finger of the opposite hand and breathe out through your left nostril.

·  Repeat the process.

·  These two full breaths are called one round of Alternate Nostril Breath.

·  Perform 5 to 9 rounds of this alternating breath between the nostrils.

·  Remember to always inhale through the same nostril you just exhaled through.

It may take a few tries before you get the coordination of inhaling, exhaling and moving your fingers back and forth between nostrils. This is not unusual so try not to get frustrated. Keep at it and you’ll get it.

Additional interesting information about alternate nostril breathing:

There was a study completed in that found that people who practiced alternate nostril breathing lowered their perceived stress levels.

Yogic breathing practices are also believed to improve lung function and respiratory endurance. This was based on a small study done in 2017 in which the effects of pranayama practice on the lung functions of competitive swimmers was found that it had a positive effect on respiratory endurance.

We know the benefits that lowering your heart rate can have on cardiovascular health. According to a study completed in 2006, engaging in a slow yogic breath such as alternative nostril breathing significantly decreased heart rate and average breathing rhythm. Research from a 2011 study found that an alternative nostril breathing program performed over a period of six weeks had a positive impact on physical and physiological fitness-based performance. The breathing technique was found to have a positive influence on blood pressure, heart rate, and vital capacity.

Additional studies found that different types of yogic breathing could have beneficial effects on neurocognitive, respiratory and metabolic functions as well as  on the nervous system.

Though safe for most people, there are medical conditions in which alternate nostril breathing may be contraindicated. (i.e., COPD, asthma, other heart or lung conditions) In the event you have any of those conditions or concerns, you should consult with your doctor to find out if it is safe for you to practice alternate nostril breathing. As with any other practice, if you experience any adverse affects, such as shortness of breath, lightheadedness, dizziness or nausea while using this technique, you should discontinue immediately.

Life can be stressful for everyone at times. Daily life events, professional and family responsibilities, personal and professional relationships, taking on new roles as a parent, caregiving for a loved one, serious life changing events or medical conditions, the list goes on and on. There is a difference between the stress from immediate short-term situations in which the body releases hormones that are part of a normal physiologic response so it goes into a heightened state of alert so it can react as in the fight or flight response. (i.e., increased breathing and heart rates) That is entirely normal.

However, stress reactions to a variety of other situations can be harmful to our health. Symptoms associated with that type of stress may include anxiety, irritability, depression, insomnia, headaches, muscle pain or tension, fatigue, sleep problems, and changes in general behavior.

Too much stress can also negatively impact general habits and behaviors. It can lead us to make poor food choices and leads to poor exercise habits. Stress can either increase or reduce appetite, most often it increases appetite and the food choices we make under stress tend to be of the more unhealthy variety, sweeter, fattier, higher calorie foods.. Psychologists have related eating to the stressed individual’s need of some manner of control over situations as well as deriving pleasure or some form of comfort.  Professionals have been known to liken eating to smoking; smokers tend to smoke more cigarettes when feeling stressed just as as individuals eat more under the same circumstances. Individuals also tend to feel fatigue or weariness with chronic stress.

Conscious breathing can help you find an inner peace and help you defend against daily frustrations and stress   Once you select a method that is right for you and begin to practice it regularly, not only  in “times of trouble” as the Beatles Song,  you’ll most likely experience a shift in how you are feeling, especially if feeling stress and frustration has been like a constant but unwanted “friend”. You might notice that you’ve become a little more resilient, and approach a variety of situations with a greater sense of peace and relaxation, are less fatigued at the end of the day, have more restful and peaceful sleep and therefore awaken with more energy  and find others responding to you in a more pleasant manner.

Listen to the Jan. 27. 2020  episode of Voices for Eldercare Advocacy  on the Voice America Empowerment Channel for the interview on finding inner peace with someone who has achieved this in his life and helped many others achieve the same by teaching meditation over the past 15 years.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/3911/voices-for-eldercare-advocacy

 

Kristen Harper will be giving a speech at Arizona State University on November 26, 2019 from 7:00pm-8:30pm

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Health & Wellness
Kristen Harper will be giving a speech at Arizona State University on November 26, 2019 from 7:00pm-8:30pm

Kristen Harper, a Health and Wellness Speaker, as well as radio show host on VoiceAmerica.com will be giving a speech at Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona for students on November 26, 2019 from 7:00pm-8:30pm.  This event will be hosted by the A S U ‘ s P H I H Q C L U B.  Kristen will be speaking on nutrition, which she will emphasize the importance of an anti-inflammatory diet.  Kristen Harper’s radio show is “Tips to Keep You Healthy, Happy, and Motivated.”

Kristen Harper’s radio show page: https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2687/tips-to-keep-you-healthy-happy-and-motivated

Kristen’s compnay website: https://perfecthealthconsultingservices.com/

Kristen’s speaking website: https://kristenharperspeaks.com/

Kristen Harper will be interviewed on the Beautiful You and New Mind Creator Podcasts November 2nd and 8th

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Health & Wellness
Kristen Harper will be interviewed on the Beautiful You and New Mind Creator Podcasts November 2nd and 8th
Kristen Harper, radio show host on VoiceAmerica.com and Health and Wellness Speaker will be involved with interviews, as well as giving a speech for the month of November 2019.  Kristen’s radio show is “Tips to Keep You Healthy, Happy, and Motivated.  
 
1) She will be interviewed on the Beautiful You Podcast November 2nd at 5pm Pacific Time by Miriam Stout who is located in Australia about my health and wellness background, as well as the challenges I have been through.
 
2) Kristen will also be interviewed on the New Mind Creator Podcast on November 8th at 2pm EST about the unconscious mind, which is her favorite topic.
 
3) Finally, Kristen Harper will be giving a speech to Arizona State University students on November 26th from 7:00-8:30pm on nutrition, emphasizing the importance of an anti-inflammatory diet.
Kristen’s speaking website: https://kristenharperspeaks.com/
Kristen’s company website:  https://perfecthealthconsultingservices.com/tips to keep you healthy happy and motivated.pngtips to keep you healthy happy and motivated.png

The Future of Aging

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Empowerment
The Future of Aging

The Eldercare Advocate

Are we living longer as a society? According to Paul Irving, Chairman of The Milken Institute Center for The Future of Aging, while overall it appears people are living to advanced ages, there is inequality in longevity which can be linked directly to socioeconomics and community.

The quality of people’s lives is significantly affected by their financial means and as well as where they live. Access to, and knowledge of, a healthy lifestyle, including regular exercise and a more healthful diet, access to health care, as well as depression, loneliness, and isolation, are factors linked to decrease in life span over the past 3 years for people who life in communities where they may be facing more challenges as opposed to those living in more rural areas. Other factors which may affect a person’s overall health issues is actually discrimination against older people, also known as ageism.

The John Hartford Foundation[1]released an issue brief in April of 2017 entitled “Reframing Aging”.  The brief emphasizes the negative impact of our society’s view of becoming older, and because of this negative view, as if it is a fate to be avoided at all costs (a conundrum in and of itself. In a previous blogpost, I suggested the incongruence of us mourning premature death as a life unfulfilled, and yet shunning the notion of getting older, avoiding the discussion at all costs.)  However, discrimination faced by older people is actually an issue of national concern which needs to be addressed. This discrimination leads us as a society to accept, tolerate or seem to be disinterested in the poor care, poor treatment, lack of dignity and lack of respect faced by older people, and indeed those that are very old.

The brief goes on to call for the need to redefine aging. This is based on the negative assumptions about what it means to get old. In addition, as Paul Irving states, there is no one size fits all. There is a vast difference to each person who is 65, 75, 85, or 95. No different that there is a vast difference amongst people of any other age group. These differences may be defined by health, wealth, education, religion, gender and sexual preference but can certainly go on from there.

Rather than having sympathy for the older person, society must shape its attitudes towards inclusion. It is indeed a human rights issue. The rights of the older person in no way differs from the rights of any other person in society.

The words we use also has a tremendous impact on our attitudes. In American culture, from the time we are little we are using the word ‘old’ as in “how old are you”. Other cultures ask the query, “how many years do you have?”, or “what year are you living?”. Transforming our language will play an important role in changing our attitudes.

Lastly, the brief suggests an entirely new perception about aging, both from society as a whole, as well as from the perspective of the person who is advancing in their years. It suggests the notion of building momentum, I support terminology such as advancing in years or continuing life’s journey. It is an accomplishment, something to be admired and respected. Other cultures consider reaching an advanced age as a jubilee of sorts.  In the latter case, it is documented that a person’s self-image has a tremendous impact on their overall health.

Science has done its part in helping people live longer. But institutions, society, businesses, communities have not necessarily kept up with science on the one hand yet, on the other, it has perpetuated our youth oriented culture. This is most evident in the $16.8 billion spent on both invasive and less invasive cosmetic techniques to maintain or regain their youthful appearance. Is this not counterintuitive to the idea of accepting and appreciating one’s age. I’ve heard people say, look at the wrinkles on my face and the gray hairs on my head, I have earned every single one. They have meaning and importance, not only in my life, but for the life of others.

What is the cost to society if we don’t change our attitudes, provide better care and a better quality of life to people as they advance in age? Those “wisdom keepers” are a valuable natural resource that can add tremendous value to our society on many fronts and to the lives of those younger than they who can indeed benefit from the wealth of acquired knowledge through years of life experience.

What is it to feel a particular age?

When we are younger, as we advance from our 20’s. to our 30’s and probably to about our 50’s we feel a sense of growth and maturity. But, what do we feel as we continue on our life’s journey from that point upward to our 60’’s, 70’s, 80’s, 90’s?

Irving points out that prior to the 20thcentury creation of the “Happy Birthday” song, age was judged by fitness, health, etc. A return to this way of thinking may help us on the road to restructuring and refashioning our attitudes towards people as they continue to age.

Hugo Gerstl, a guest on Voices for Eldercare Advocacy remains a practicing trial attorney and author of 5 books at seventy-eight years of age.  He suggests that despite what we see in the mirror, a person always remains the same age deep down inside himself or herself, and that age is early maturity.

Gerstl also suggests that there is not a limitation or an endpoint in the jobs of life and he believes that the attitude one has toward or traditional idea of a job affects our attitudes towards life.  In our early years, through teens or early twenties for some, it is the job of going to school which is followed by years of gainful employment. But, if one chooses to end their traditional employment, they can think of their job as a continuation to acquire knowledge, to grow, to help others, to have interests beyond himself or herself. This is what keeps a person vital, vibrant, active and engaged. In doing so, there are significant contributions one can make though they may take on a different form.

[1]https://www.johnahartford.org/dissemination-center/view/reframing-aging-issue-brief-released

Sharon Kleyne & Former CDC Dr. Yinong Chong Discover Same Healthcare Wavelength on Talk Radio

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Health & Wellness
Sharon Kleyne & Former CDC Dr. Yinong Chong Discover Same Healthcare Wavelength on Talk Radio

Bio Logic Aqua® Research Incubates Water Evaporation Studies & Supplementation Worldwide. Former CDC Scientist Dr. Yinong Chong Discovers Education Ally on Sharon Kleyne Talk Radio.

Date aired: August 26th, 2019

Guest: Dr. Yinong Chong, former General Health Scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Hysattsville, Maryland

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/116989/all-about-pain-from-national-data-to-personal-experience

Sharon Kleyne, founder and research director of Bio Logic Aqua® Research Water Life Science® discovers that she is on the same Health Olympics, healthcare wavelength as retired CDC General Health Scientist, Dr. Yinong Chong. Chong and Kleyne, internationally respected researchers, find that their research into water and disease paralleled each other’s efforts for decades.

Kleyne describes the work of herself and her colleagues at Bio Logic Aqua® Research. We incubate technological water and evaporation studies worldwide,” Kleyne says, “to understand the behavior of every living being on earth. We study evaporation of humans.” At the beginning of time, Kleyne explains that the atmosphere had to learn to incubate and mature with the rhythm of the solar system, with that movement.

“Life continues in the mother’s womb,” Kleyne continues, “that pocket of water, and is nurtured by nature to be able to develop a life that will have a percentage of water per organ. That water developed electrolitically like a battery. Everything is water. Everything!”

Kleyne goes on to describe the moment of birth and its critical aftermath. “When you first come out,” Kleyne teaches, “your eyes are open. You look around and you’re emotional. You just don’t understand what’s going on here! You’re like a sieve. So, as a baby you begin to evaporate—no two eyes alike, no two fingerprints alike—we even look a little bit different.

“Now,” Kleyne extends her lesson, “when that baby goes home, is it getting a good enough health education, with the parents? I don’t think so! I’m alarmed by that. I think parents should have to go to class before they can take that baby home—mandatory class. The baby has to learn how to breathe, eat, drink water, exercise with fun, find her voice and sleep with nature. We all need sleep. Yet, drinking water is vital! One needs to drink a full glass at a time for maximum absorption and consume 8-10 glasses a day.”

Dr. Chong, who worked at the CDC for twenty-two years and maintains a private health practice today, also stresses the importance of water and homeopathic treatments for many ailments that Americans treat with painkillers instead. As a result, millions have become addicted and further damaged their health.

Dr. Chong, a native of China who emigrated to the U.S. for graduate studies in 1990, refers listeners to the Data Visualization Gallery on line at the CDC. This gallery charts the way Americans die and includes age, gender, diseases and addictions.

Chong also cites a study initially done by the CDC in 2009. The study resulted in a map of all U.S. counties and showed how many people everywhere were dying of overdoses. By popular demand, this study was thoroughly updated in 2014.

Kleyne, host of the internationally syndicated weekly talk radio program, The Sharon Kleyne Hour Water Life Science®/Nature’s Pharma®, The Power of Water® & Your Health sponsored by Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® on VoiceAmerica, agrees with Chong that we need extensive retraining in the new technology of supplementation for body water evaporation and evaporation of the atmosphere. “Listen to your body,” Chong encourages. “Nature will provide.”

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If you would like to listen to Dr. Yinong Chong, retired General Health Scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Hysattsville, Maryland, wellness coach trained by the Mayo Clinic and a Tai Chi instructor with Health Olympics creator, proactive healthcare advocate and international body water and atmospheric evaporation researcher Sharon Kleyne, follow this link: https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/116989/all-about-pain-from-national-data-to-personal-experience

Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® Sponsors Radio Talk With Medical Intuitive Dr. Mary Bulbrook

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Health & Wellness
Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® Sponsors Radio Talk With Medical Intuitive Dr. Mary Bulbrook

Sharon Kleyne Talk Radio Teaches Healthy Living with Rhythm of the Universe Health Olympics. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® Dry Eye Relief Sponsors Kleyne’s Health Olympics & Emotional Control.

Date aired: August 5th, 2019

Guest: Dr. Mary Bulbrook

Health Olympics founder Sharon Kleyne, host of the internationally syndicated weekly talk radio program, The Sharon Kleyne Hour Water Life Science®/Nature’s Pharma®, The Power of Water® & Your Health sponsored by Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® on VoiceAmerica, welcomed medical intuitive Dr. Mary Bulbrook to her program to talk about near-death experiences and health care.

Bio Logic Aqua® Research Water Life Science® founder and research director Sharon Kleyne has taught for more than thirty years that “everything around you is an invention of technology”. Kleyne wants people to think ahead, without excess emotion, embracing the rhythm of earth and the universe, and learning all they can about body water evaporation and evaporation of earth’s watery atmosphere. “Be part of the Health Olympics!” Kleyne declares.

Kleyne described the great challenge she met beginning decades ago. “I decided to take on the whole world,” said Kleyne. “I accepted the challenge to teach, teach, teach to the whole world about the blue ribbon surrounding this planet way back in time. It dropped down in the form of rain and brought life. Babies begin developing in a pocket of water, then are born into our water atmosphere, the breath of life.” Kleyne also teaches that evaporation is a process that affects us from the moment we are born to the end of life—death.

It’s death, or rather near-death experiences, that fascinate Dr. Mary Bulbrook. Bulbrook, a native of Cincinnati and trained as a nurse, began hearing voices at a young age and has been hearing them ever since. Raised in the Catholic church, close to animals and plants, Bulbrook’s extensive travels and exposure to other religions and cultures have expanded her world view.

This expansion includes her interests and focus, which have brought her international renown as a co-creative healing medium, an expert energy specialist, mystic and certified shaman. She’s worked extensively with traditional healers in Peru, New Zealand, Australia and South Africa. Bulbrook combines science, spirituality, health care and energy therapies in her healing Health Olympics work. She is currently the Dean of the CAM Institute at Akamai University and with the International Association of Near-Death Societies a sharing group facilitator, working on line with people around the world who share their experiences. Bulbrook also currently works with children, helping them to cope with anxiety issues and emotional stress.

It’s emotional stress that has captured Kleyne’s attention. Her research shows that the more stress a person feels, the more over-evaporated they are. Over-evaporated people are overly-emotional people, That is why she developed Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® for dry eye relief and Nature’s Mist® Face of the Water® for dry skin caused by over-evaporation body water.

Bulbrook agrees with Kleyne. “I believe life is a journey and we’re here to learn lessons,” said Bulbrook. “People who can’t handle their emotions can hurt themselves and others. We’re all here to practice love.”

“That is why more self-control, proactive health habits and participation in the Health Olympics are so important,” Kleyne concluded.

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If you want to listen to Dr. Mary Bulbrooks describe near-death experiences and Health Olympics creator Sharon Kleyne discuss emotional balance, living in rhythm with the universe and the planet, water evaporation, Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® and dry eye relief, follow this link: https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/116573/life-and-death-mythical-near-death-experiences

Power Of Children Promoted By Club Northwest & Sharon Kleyne

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Power Of Children Promoted By Club Northwest & Sharon Kleyne

Club Northwest Creates Community Wellness Center for All Ages in Grants Pass, Oregon. Club Northwest Share Health & Wellness Programs for Children & Adults on Kleyne Talk Radio.

Date aired: August 12th, 2019

Guest: Annette & Scott Draper, Founders, Club Northwest, Grants Pass, Oregon

Sharon Kleyne, host of the internationally syndicated weekly talk radio program, The Sharon Kleyne Hour Water Life Science®/Nature’s Pharma®, The Power of Water® & Your Health sponsored by Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® on VoiceAmerica, envisions her program as a living lab that welcomes internationally acclaimed scientists, researchers, physicians, authors, teachers and global game-changers from around the world. Kleyne also teaches body water evaporation and the supplementation of eyes, organs and skin with pure water while pursuing cures, not remission for diseases. Kleyne also stresses the importance of children. “Think about the children,” Kleyne says. “Children should be the top priority in any community.”

Kleyne sees her home community, Grants Pass, Oregon, as a place that embraces that golden rule, and none in that community do it more effectively than Annette and Scott Draper, co-founders of Club Northwest, which now boasts a membership of over 9,000 members in a town whose total population is 36,000.

“I knew it was going to be a journey,” says Scott, looking back to the planning before the launch of Club Northwest. He reminisced how he and five founding executives met at a home in Hood River for several days until they had a plan. Once they emerged, they knew that they wanted to create “an environment in which everyone had the best chance to succeed”.

Since then, in a beautiful 60,000 square foot building in Grants Pass, Club Northwest offers many fitness and wellness programs including offerings in aquatics, yoga, rock climbing, a NASA-inspired gyro-gym and a program for members dealing with Parkinson’s Disease. When Kleyne asks for a feature of Club Northwest that stands out, Scott says, “the variety of folks we have there and the variety of health education we offer. We work on the mental, physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing of members,” Scott continues. “Club Northwest is a Top 100 fitness and wellness center in the U.S. and a Top 100 Green Workplace in Oregon.”

“Club Northwest also offers a world-class luxury health spa,” adds Annette, who designed and launched it in 2007. “At the spa,” says Annette, “you can have everything head-to-toe and experience that positive energy. What we hear most from members is ‘It’s a sanctuary!”

These are wonderful programs and opportunities, yet most important to Kleyne are the programs for children. “We all need to do it for the children,” Kleyne says.

Of course, the Drapers agree, which is why they also created within Club Northwest a renowned Kid Zone—thousands of feet dedicated to wellness, education and fun for children. After bringing school classes to Club Northwest for programs at the Kid Zone, some teachers have told the Drapers that Club Northwest will be, for some of their students, the closest they will ever get to visiting Disneyland. “All kids moving with a smile,” says Scott; “that’s what we aim for at Kid Zone.”

All new members are supported by a well-trained staff of fitness muses (coaches), nutritionists and a physician. “When a new member joins us, we explore the Why,” Scott says. “Why did the person join the club in the first place? We wrap a program around that member rather than wrap the member around the club.”

“At Club Northwest,” says Kleyne, “everyone becomes a proactive member of the Health Olympics!”

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If you would like to listen to Annette & Scott Draper talk about Club Northwest, its many wellness and fitness programs, the Kid Zone, community-building and the health of children with Health Olympics creator Sharon Kleyne, water evaporation expert and the inventor of Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®, follow this link: https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/116679/the-rise-of-love

Kristen Harper will be speaking at Arizona Pinners Conference on the “Top Ways to Reduce Stress” in Scottsdale, Arizona November 9, 2018

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Health & Wellness
Kristen Harper will be speaking at Arizona Pinners Conference on the “Top Ways to Reduce Stress” in Scottsdale, Arizona November 9, 2018

Please attend Kristen Harper’s speech on November 9, 2018 (Friday) at the Arizona Pinners Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona at 6:30pm on the “Top Ways to Reduce Stress.”

 

Kristen Harper is a Health and Wellness Speaker who inspires audiences to get healthy and stay healthy.  She is also  the radio show host for Tips to Keep You Healthy, Happy, and Motivated on VoiceAmerica.com every Tuesday at 3pm Pacific Time.

 

You can purchase tickets for the event at https://az.pinnersconference.com/  Free Foot Reflexology Rollers as Giveaways during Kristen’s speech!

 

Kristen Harper’s speaking website:  https://www.kristenharperspeaks.com/

 

Tips to Keep You Healthy, Happy, and Motivated radio show:  https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2687/tips-to-keep-you-healthy-happy-and-motivated  Health and Wellness experts, Celebrities, Influencers, authors, researchers, and doctors have been interviewed on Kristen Harper’s radio show.

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