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Political Risk Mgmt. and the Global Supply Chain w/ Ralph Kliem

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Business
Political Risk Mgmt. and the Global Supply Chain w/ Ralph Kliem

Join me Nov 3/22 at 1pm EST!

Political Risk and Supply Chain Management are two important topics in today’s world. I talk with the founder of LeanPM LLC and author of “Political Risk Management and the Global Supply Chain”, Ralph Kliem.

In our talk we touch on:

1. Defining Political Risk,

2. Political risk drivers,

3. Key components of managing political risk,

4. The risk register and what information it should contain,

5. The skills and knowledge required to manage political risk,

6. Risk reporting and audit,

7. The Political Risk Management Plan,

8. Political biases in political risks,

9. Monitoring the supply chain and maintaining the risk register,

10. Risk triggers,

11. Identify political risks that can impact you supply chain.

Ralph offers allot of great insights into political risk, and by understanding and monitoring political risk, you can help manage your supply chain. A great discussion you won’t want to miss. Enjoy!

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How Supply Chains Contribute Successful BCM, Risk, & Crisis Mgmt.

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Business
How Supply Chains Contribute Successful BCM, Risk, & Crisis Mgmt.

Join me Oct 13/22 at 1pm EST on the VA Business Channel!

The success of Business Continuity, Risk Management, and Crisis Management, can be aided in part by having strong Supply Chain Management practices. I speak with Supply Chain and Business Continuity expert Kush Srivastava.

We talk about:

1. Domains and Common Elements,

2. The opportunities to leverage from the various domains,

3. The congruence analyzed,

4. The rolling impact of Supply Chain Management,

5. How SCRM aids in better BCPs, Crisis Mgmt., and Response & Recovery,

6. Mapping the Supply Chain,

7. Becoming a preferred customer,

8. De-clustering,

9. Flexibility in the Supply Chain.

It’s an interesting discussion that helps us understand how these four areas can work together to contribute to resilience, and realize that Supply Chain Management can be a silent lifeline for the success of each program.

Enjoy!

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What You Should Know About Supply Chain Continuity Management

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Business
What You Should Know About Supply Chain Continuity Management

Join me July 14/22 at 1pm EST!

If the COVID19 global pandemic has taught organizations anything, it’s to develop a stronger focus on their supply chain. I speak with Supply Chain Management (SCM) expert Matthias Rosenberg about what you should know about SCM to help your organizations and communities deal with disruptions in a proactive and positive manner.

We talk about:

1. Defining Supply Chain Management,

2. The different perspectives on Supply Chain (e.g., Corporate view vs. SCM view),

3. SCM complexities,

4. Supply Chain Continuity Management (SCCM),

5. The SCCM Lifecycle (Analysis, Design, Implementation, Validation…),

6. SCCM solution options,

7. SCCM/SCM challenges, and

8. Some quick tips for professionals and organizations.

It’s an in depth talk about SCM you don’t want to miss. Enjoy!

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Improving Supply Chain Resilience with Suppliers (w/ Zera Zheng)

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Business
Improving Supply Chain Resilience with Suppliers (w/ Zera Zheng)

Join me July 21/22 at 1pm EST!

Working with you suppliers is key if you want to create Supply Chain Resilience for your organization. I talk with the Head of Business Resilience Lead Logistics at Maersk, and BCI award winner, Zera Zheng.

Zera is very passionate about supply chain resilience and we have a very interesting talk, touching on such subjects as:

1. The elements of Supply Chain Resilience Management,

2. Supply Chain Mapping,

3. Contingency Options and Contingency Strategies (Acceptance, Reduce dependency, Work with Suppliers, Exit the relationship),

4. We get a real-life viewpoint of how Mearsk managed the Suez ‘ship’ crisis (You know the ship stuck in the canal),

5. 3 key areas of focus when supporting customers (Visibility, Alternative Solutions, Communications),

6. Supply chain resilience through collaboration, and more.

It’s a very interesting talk with some new perspectives on Supply Chain Management and Resilience. Enjoy!

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Minimizing Cyber-attack Impacts: Digital Supply Chain Management

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Business
Minimizing Cyber-attack Impacts: Digital Supply Chain Management

Join me August 4/22 at 1pm EST!

There is allot of focus on our physical Supply Chains, but what about digital supply chains? I talk with long time lead auditor for ISO 9001, ISO 27001 and other standards, Willy Fabritius. Willy takes a different view of Supply Chain Management and talks about the digital aspects, rather than the traditionally focus of physical products and their supply chains. It’s a new perspective that hasn’t been fully talked about until now.

Willy talks about:

1. Defining digital supply chains,

2. Digital supply chain issues,

3. Products and Services obtained through a digital manner,

4. Impacts of digital changes to products already in use,

5. Key program components and possible solutions,

6. Risk Assessments / Analysis,

7. Regulatory requirements,

8. User awareness (People aren’t as aware as you might think.),

9. Incident management and learning from them,

10. Management Systems,

11. Independent reviews and assessments (Governance)…and more.

It’s a very informative talk with a focus many aren’t considering in Supply Chain Management; the digital aspects. Don’t miss this!

Enjoy!

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Rethinking Org Risk: Lessons Learned Throughout 2020 (Andy Witts)

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Business
Rethinking Org Risk: Lessons Learned Throughout 2020 (Andy Witts)

Join me April 7, 2022, 1pm EST (Business Channel)!

The last few years have taught us allot about organizational risk, business continuity, and lessons learned. I speak with noted expert Andrew Witts, about the lessons learned during 2020/2021…and perhaps into 2022.

In this episode we talk about:

a) Why do we need to rethink the way we do business continuity?

b) Some of the lessons learned from 2020 (e.g., Loss of Resources, Locations, Staff, Vendor, Applications,

c) “Compound Threats” and what this means,

d) The supply chain,

e) Cyber impacts caused by the pandemic,

f) Human capital impacts, and g) How risk can help Business Continuity.

Lots of great topics with allot of great insights. Enjoy!

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Operational Resilience with Mike Campbell (Fusion Risk Management)

Posted by Felix Assivo on
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Variety
Operational Resilience with Mike Campbell (Fusion Risk Management)

Join me 9am EST November 11, 2021!

Due to COVID and the impact felt by all industries, Operational Resilience has become a major focal point for organizations. Join me as I talk with Fusion Risk Management CEO, Mike Campbell. Mike clears up the confusion between organizational resilience and operations resilience, and the importance for organization’s for focus on resilience. We’ll also talk about the various components that make up operational resilience and how an organization can begin to tear down the silos, while building up resilience. Mike will also talk about the new paradigm organization’s face with employees working from home, and how the traditional ‘everyone-back-in-the-office’ approach may no longer work going forward. We’ll also discuss how strong operational resilience can help organizations with decision-making, especially during disasters, crises, and incidents, when the demand for information goes up and the time to provide it goes down.

A very enjoyable chat about operational resilience, with lots of insights for leaders. Don’t miss it! Listen to Variety podcasts.

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A Practical Guide to Building Supply Chain Resilience w/ Paul Raw

Posted by presspass on
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Variety
A Practical Guide to Building Supply Chain Resilience w/ Paul Raw

Join me September 16, 2021 at 9am EST!

Supply Chain Management and building resiliency within your supply chain is more than thinking about finding alternate suppliers. I talk with recognized Supply Chain Management industry expert Paul Raw, about what really makes up a good Supply Chain Management system and the considerations that organizations often overlook – or don’t even know about. We’ll touch on how the supply chain can be managed effectively using risk identification and risk management practices. Paul will also talk about he Resiliency Cycle (Prevention, Mitigation, Preparation, Response, Recovery) using real-world examples and some personal experiences. Paul takes Supply Chain Management and Resiliency into a much more detailed world.

Don’t miss it!

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Op. Resilience in Prof. Services – Compliance in the Supply Chain

Posted by presspass on
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Variety
Op. Resilience in Prof. Services – Compliance in the Supply Chain

Join me July 22, 2021 at 9am EST!

In December 20219, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK published a paper that “…Firms identify their important business services and apply resilience impact tolerances.” This has can have a significant impact upon an organization’s supply chain and ensuring compliance with the FCA directive. I speak with Sarah Garrington who will outline the compliance requirements contained within the FCA publication and what organizations can do to address it. Sarah outlines high-level considerations and steps corporate leaders must consider when planning to respond to the FCA requirement and ensure compliance. We even touch on work completed via the Business Impact Analysis (BIA). The FCA directive will have far-reaching impacts, so be sure to tune in and learn what you might need to address, even if you’re not in the UK. A very information and important episode.

Don’t miss it!

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The Ghosts of Christmas Past: How Retailers Can Avoid a Repeat of 2015’s Challenging Holiday Season – Part 2 What to Do Now

Posted by Editor on
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Business
The Ghosts of Christmas Past: How Retailers Can Avoid a Repeat of 2015’s Challenging Holiday Season – Part 2 What to Do Now

Dubose Christmas Past cc Willo

This post is written by David S. DuBose, Director of Supply Chain Solutions, Sedlak
This three-part series explores a number of near-term and long-term moves retailers can make to eliminate or minimize holiday season fulfillment headaches and ensure their supply chain is up to the task.

In part one of the series, we identified the issues retailers faced during the holiday season of 2015. Specifically, retailers were unequipped to handle the surge in online sales and a prolonged holiday shopping season. In this second section of the series, we detail the specific actions retailers should take now to improve their operative efficiency and achieve success.

Retailers should start by analyzing the 2015 season’s volumes to understand where things broke down. Two dimensions, in particular, are important to explore:
1. One is product flow: How does merchandise flow through the network? What are the routings? How does it get from factories through the distribution network—and how does this add to or limit flexibility?
2. The other is capacity: What are the capacity and flexibility of the different nodes in the network—the central DC, regional DCs, and any consolidation points or pooled distribution points? Did carriers and suppliers provide sufficient capacity?
Other important capacity levers to analyze include pick faces, throughput, parking, storage areas, staging, and sorters/conveyors. Ideally, this analysis should be done at the SKU level (or, at minimum, the product group level) so a retailer can fully understand the amount of space needed in the DC for each item’s slot. Such insights can indicate whether the projected product flow for the upcoming season will overwhelm the DC’s ability to store and fulfill product.

In some cases, spreadsheets will do the trick. But for a growing number of retailers whose network complexity has mushroomed, more robust packaged tools are likely required. Sophisticated modeling tools enable a retailer to simultaneously consider and optimize complex trade-offs among distribution, production, transportation, service levels and working capital. In doing so, the company can understand the economic benefits and costs of strategic scenarios relative to an agreed-upon baseline.

Such analyses also can help a retailer pinpoint bottlenecks in the network that erode performance. One of the most common is labor: The retailer may not have enough people working in the DC at the right times to keep up with the volume of orders during promotion- or volume-driven spikes. Another typical bottleneck is equipment: The DC’s materials handling equipment—sorters and conveyors—may simply be maxed out. Trucking could also be a problem: There’s insufficient trucking capacity on key lanes to get products from DC to DC or from a delivery agent to stores.
Eliminating the bottlenecks

There are several ways to eliminate or minimize these bottlenecks, depending on the nature and location of the problem. At a high level, retailers can either change the flow or change the capacity.

For instance, one simple step could be to alter the timing of the inbound flow: If a retailer finds that its products are creating a logjam at the receiving docks because they’re all arriving at once, it could smooth out inbound flow by pooling some product in an upstream facility, meter it in, and then release it to the DC in a just-in-time flow. This can help ensure that the products aren’t storming the gate at the same time and overwhelming the DC.

But more often, the answer is to add more capacity to the network to improve outbound flow. One obvious move is to increase the number of people on hand by adding more shifts or work days to boost labor capacity. Another move could involve rethinking how the retailer groups or waves orders for picking in the warehouse management system.

For instance, using a simulation tool, the company could find there are some logical groupings—say, picking all single-item orders that are going to a particular geography—that can make picking more efficient. Doing so can boost the existing labor pool’s productivity, which means an increase in units picked per hour without having to bring on more people. This is especially critical with the online, direct-to-consumer business, which tends to be a lot more dynamic and promotions driven during the holidays.

Such grouping decisions must be made in the context of the retailer’s broader service-level strategy (free shipping? one-day? two-day?) and cut-off times for parcel delivery providers.

Retailers also can employ the fairly standard practice of grouping all single-SKU orders for its online business in a processing wave—as lululemon athletica does. Through its warehouse management system, the yoga retailer separates single-line from multi-line orders, picking the former into a large tote that can hold as many as 35 orders and packing them using an autobagger. This eliminates manual packing from single-line orders and boosts efficiency.

For physical stores, a retailer can relieve some stress on the DC by pushing unallocated inventory to delivery agents, then flowing the inventory to the stores once demand becomes clear. In this way, the company can “read and react” more effectively to local markets or stores and more precisely place inventory at the store level. But there are technology implications: The business must have real-time visibility to the inventory at the delivery agent (typically a third party), which means the retailer’s and agent’s systems must be tightly linked.

In cases where it’s impossible to change the flow or squeeze any more capacity from the existing network, it could be time to go outside for help. Third-party logistics companies can provide supplemental capacity to relieve some of the pressure. But it’s important to lock up that help early; competition for such services becomes more fierce as the holidays get closer.

Collaborating via S&OP

A more ambitious action—one that could take longer than a few months to implement, but also is potentially much more impactful—is to adopt a “retail version” of sales and operations planning (S&OP). The goal is to get key merchants and supply chain decision makers together on a formal basis to collaboratively determine how best to meet the one- to two-month surge in demand. Using a simple model, such as the one below, the combined team can more effectively understand where they expect the peaks and valleys of demand and how the company will respond.

A simple model for a retail version of S&OP

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Of course, S&OP’s not a crystal ball. Demand will lag for some items and exceed estimates for others. Promotions will be offered, generating spikes in demand. To help deal with this uncertainty, the team can look to the previous year as a guide. An analysis of past seasons could indicate that certain factors typically resulted in a specific promotion and accompanying spike in demand. This insight can help the supply chain team understand how the merchants are thinking about demand so they can ensure the supply chain can be responsive to those changes. For instance, the supply chain team might create new, temporary fulfillment nodes to flex capacity, increase speed, and reduce delivery costs.

In essence, S&OP helps the merchants and supply chain professionals create a basic “playbook” for the season. This playbook lays out a variety of demand scenarios and actions merchants could take, and the corresponding potential moves the supply chain would need to make to support those actions. Thus, during the season, when a merchant calls a specific “play”—e.g., a promotion on a slow-selling item or a chase order for more of a hot product—the supply chain isn’t caught off guard and forced to scramble to respond. It already knows what’s coming and what it, in turn, will do.

Importantly, with S&OP, communication goes both ways. True, the merchants must keep the supply chain informed of their thinking. But the supply chain team also must be upfront about what’s operationally possible and reasonable. They need to be able to say to a merchant, “We’ve deeply analyzed the situation, and if you take this action, we know what will happen from a supply chain perspective, and we’re going to have a bunch of angry customers.” From there, the merchants and supply chain team can jointly come up with the best solution.

Here’s how one company, a multi-billion dollar, global fashion retailer, used S&OP to its advantage. Several years ago, during an enterprise-wide systems upgrade, the company implemented tools to monitor and manage the flow of product through the distribution network. Beyond the tools, the company put in place a complete solution—encompassing people, process and technology—that became known as “Flow Planning.” Flow Planning became a critical, in-line planning function that optimized inventory flow through the network, subject to each store’s service requirements. Essentially, it dynamically solved the problem of “pushing the pig through the python”—managing the bubble of product flow in an efficient and effective way to ensure product availability. The S&OP dimension of this retailer’s solution is the ongoing dialogue between merchandise planning and allocation and the flow planning teams, which is backed up by fact-based analysis. This is especially critical in handling “fractional” or ”digital” demand—i.e., items that sell fewer than one unit per week, such as “fringe” sizes or items in uncommon combinations of style, size and color.

Part 3 of this series will detail the additional, and more substantial, steps needed to build stronger operational capabilities to improve holiday season performance in future years.
For nearly 60 years, Sedlak has helped retailers optimize their operations to meet peak season volumes and deliver on their promises to their customers. To learn more, visit www.jasedlak.com.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Willo

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