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Healing from Trauma by Reclaiming Your Body with Suzanne Scurlock-Durana By Dr. Paula Joyce

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Empowerment
Healing from Trauma by Reclaiming Your Body with Suzanne Scurlock-Durana By Dr. Paula Joyce

Suzanne Scurlock-Durana is the author of Reclaiming Your Body: Healing from Trauma and Awakening to Your Body’s Wisdom and Full Body Presence. Her Healing from the Core curriculum combined with CranioSacral therapy and other bodywork modalities creates a complete, body-centered guide to awareness, healing, and joy. A sought-after speaker in her field, Suzanne inspires people all over the world to stay energized using her life-changing tools for stress management and full body presence. She also has authored numerous articles, and thousands visit her popular blog, Presence Matters: Reflections on Body, Mind and Spirit at: www.healingfromthecore.com/blog
At least half of us have experienced trauma, more commonly known as abuse, bullying or PTSD.

 

We often avoid using the word trauma by labeling abusers as controlling, manipulative, angry or cold. Somehow these terms make the abusers actions acceptable. They are not. Whether abuse is emotional, psychological, physical, sexual or financial, it causes deep wounds. The most harmful wounds are emotional. When the trauma is occurring, most people are not able to process what’s happening. They’re just trying to survive. The emotions have to go somewhere so they go deep into the body where they may hide for years causing physical, mental and emotional problems. The person disconnects from their body in order to not feel the pain. We all do this to some extent, like when someone says something cruel to us. To heal, we must reconnect with our bodies, which takes time and patience. Please join us Thursday to learn how you can reclaim your body, access its wisdom and heal from trauma.

Out of Sight-Out of Mind: The Reality of Disenfranchised Grief By Dr. Suzanne B. Phillips

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Variety
Out of Sight-Out of Mind: The Reality of Disenfranchised Grief By Dr. Suzanne B. Phillips

With reference to the New York Times article “Rape, Race and the Jogger,” this blog considers how overlooked violence and murder and loss exemplifies “Disenfranchised Grief.” It considers that when the experience of violence and grief suffered by some becomes “ cut out” of the social discourse, ultimately-we all suffer.

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Healing Trauma through Yoga By Paula Joyce

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7th Wave

Becky Thompson, PhD, is a scholar, poet, activist and yoga teacher whose work focuses on trauma and healing. She is the author of Survivors on the Yoga Mat and several other books related to social justice and healing. She is Department Chair and Professor of Sociology at Simmons College and a senior level yoga instructor who teaches at conferences, workshops, and community centers internationally. Becky’s poetry can be found in her book, Zero Is the Whole I Fall into at Night as well as The Harvard Review, Tidal Basin Review and Sinister Wisdom. Her honors and awards include Rockefeller and Ford Fellowships, the Gustavus Myers Award for Outstanding Books on Human Rights, the Mosaic Award for Excellence in Teaching, and the Creative Justice Poetry Prize. Please visit www.beckythompsonyoga.com 
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Our attitudes, knowledge and treatment of trauma has changed over time. When I was a child, people rarely spoke openly about trauma. They hid it out of shame or a misguided belief that they should tough it out. Some, like my father, dealt with childhood abuse by creating the outer appearance of a successful, happy family. Others, like my aunt, whose oldest son died in WWII, paced the floor while talking to herself, struggling to find the will to go on. Then counseling became acceptable and dominated the field until drugs became a panacea. Now we know that some things can’t be put into words or solved with a pill. Research shows us that when we have no way of understanding what is happening to us or the skills to process it and let it go, our painful experiences, thoughts and emotions get stored in our bodies. That’s why some of the new work that focuses on healing through the body is so important. Please join us Thursday to learn how yoga, meditation and spirituality can heal trauma.

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How You Can Become a Peak-Performing Person and Leader: Tackling Taboo Realities Like Sexual Violence and Tobacco Use Head-On by Hemda Mizrahi

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Business
How You Can Become a Peak-Performing Person and Leader: Tackling Taboo Realities Like Sexual Violence and Tobacco Use Head-On by Hemda Mizrahi

Peter Prichard Photo Cropped Sarah Beaulieu Photo Cropped

Leadership and social change experts Peter Prichard and Sarah Beaulieu joined me on “Turn the Page” to discuss two taboo topics—tobacco use and sexual violence. In sharing compelling personal stories that galvanized their social change missions, Peter and Sarah demonstrate how truth-telling can empower you to become a peak-performing person and leader who chooses to make a difference

Sarah and Peter extended their information sharing after the show to provide you with additional support and encouragement.

SEXUAL VIOLENCE IS NOT JUST A WOMEN’S ISSUE.
Sarah notes, “One challenge with sexual violence is that many people view it as a “women’s issue.” Sexual violence directly impacts about one out of four women AND one out of six men in the United States. You can learn more about the facts surrounding men and sexual violence at: http://theenlivenproject.com/convo-graphic-the-truth-about-men-and-sexual-violence/

OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOU TO CONTRIBUTE TO SOLUTIONS
Sarah is working on a book to help men support survivors of sexual violence in their lives and become stronger champions for sexual violence. If you’d like to contribute your perspective to this book, please complete her men’s survey and invite your colleagues and friends to do the same

She shares a few of the many practical ways that you can support stigmatized issues like sexual violence without re-vamping your company’s community relations efforts: follow an anti-sexual violence organization on social media; sponsor a table at a fundraising event; or provide skilled volunteer support to group that works directly with survivors.

She also suggests exploring how sexual violence might intersect with issues that you or your employer already support, citing the following examples: “while childhood exposure to sexual violence can impact your physical and mental health (http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy), few organizations that focus on heart disease, diabetes, or obesity view sexual violence prevention and response as a part of their own work to eliminate these chronic conditions.

Similarly, sexual abuse or assault at home drives many adolescents into the foster care system, or homelessness, which in turn places them at higher risk. Groups committed to ending homelessness for teens ought to consider sexual violence prevention as a part of their strategy. Finally, sexual violence prevention can help to increase rates of high school graduation. According to America’s Promise Alliance (http://www.americaspromise.org), students need safe spaces and social supports to learn and thrive. That includes a home and school life free of sexual violence.”

WANT TO TAKE ON TOUGH CHALLENGES? Peter advises:

CREATE A STATEMENT OF PURPOSE THAT WILL DIRECT YOUR LIFE.
“In my experience as a leadership development consultant and career coach, individuals who create a specific statement about who they are and what they represent are better positioned to tackle taboo realities or other difficult situations that confront them.” He references Stephen Covey’s best-selling book, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” as a valuable resource for creating a personal mission statement (refer to Covey’s chapter on Habit 2, “Begin with the end in mind.”). In Covey’s words, here’s what this declaration can do for you: “Once you have that sense of mission, you have the essence of your own proactivity. You have the vision and the values, which direct your life.  You have the basic direction from which you set your long-and short-term goals.”

BUILD RESILIENCY THAT IS GROUNDED IN SELF-AWARENESS.
Peter recommends Dr. Al Siebert’s book, “The Resiliency Advantage: Master Change, Thrive Under Pressure, and Bounce Back From Setbacks,” and the confidential, free-of-charge, Resiliency Quiz available through Dr. Siebert’s site, www.resiliencycenter.com. The quiz will help you to identify and enhance the behaviors through which you respond to challenges.

ENSURE THAT YOUR AMBITION SERVES YOUR CAUSE & YOUR TEAM.
Referring to a June 2006 Harvard Business Review article entitled “Leadership Run Amok: The Destructive Potential of Overachievers,” Peter cautions: “Many overachievers act in a way that lessens positive feelings in others.” He points to the research of Jim Collins in his monograph “Good to Great and the Social Sectors,” which describes the most effective Level 5 Leaders as “ambitious first and foremost for the cause, the movement, the mission, the work—not themselves.”

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU BRING TO THE REALITIES YOU FACE?
Understanding what you have to offer is foundational to leading yourself and others through difficult change initiatives. Peter’s websites offer tools through which you can inventory the range of competencies that will enable you to contribute to a positive result:
www.makebigtobaccounprofitable.com  AND  www.workforthecommongood.com.

CREATE A BRAIN-HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PLAN.
Peter identifies Dr. Paul Bendheim’s, book “The Brain Training Revolution: A Proven Workout for Healthy Brain Functioning,” as a comprehensive, well-researched, and practical guide for accessing your mental capacity to confront challenges. Regardless of the resources you choose to engage, designing a lifestyle that enhances your physical and mental functioning will equip you to contribute to the common good more effectively and over a longer period of time.”

A MESSAGE FROM SARAH ABOUT WHAT’S POSSIBLE FOR YOU TOO
“Facing a traumatic experience like sexual violence has taught me about resilience and strength, and enhanced my ability to support others in their leadership pathways.”

READ ON.
Peter’s own mission statement is reflected in two books that he’s written to bring into focus realities surrounding sexual violence and tobacco use amongst teens, and solutions: “Dawn of Hope” AND “Dawn of the Tobacco Wars: The Sequel to Dawn of Hope”.

We all have at least one torch to light! Sarah and Peter have inspired me to light mine! How about you? Listen to our conversation and learn more

How Craniosacral Therapy Alleviates Pain, Disability, and Dysfunction by Hemda Mizrahi

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Business
How Craniosacral Therapy Alleviates Pain, Disability, and Dysfunction by Hemda Mizrahi

Tracy Lin

Physical Therapist and Craniosacral Therapy (CST) practitioner Tracy Lin joined me on “Turn the Page” to talk about how CST goes beyond treating the physical symptoms of pain, disability and dysfunction, to address causes that are rooted in the psyche and emotions. If you’re still exploring ways you can regain your health and mobility post-injuries, illness, surgeries, or other issues, CST might be one of your “missing links.”

Craniosacral Therapy complements most healthcare modalities, both mainstream and alternative, such as acupuncture, psychology, chiropractic care, and dentistry. It can be integrated as one of a host of other interventions used to address complex medical problems and needs.

After the show, Tracy shared the following three scenarios to further illustrate the benefits of CST. Perhaps you can find yourself, or someone you know in the presenting issues.

48-YEAR OLD FEMALE WITH DIAGNOSIS OF LEFT HIP LABRAL TEAR
PRESENTING ISSUES
The patient slipped on the floor while her foot was caught in the ground. She experienced pain when getting in and out of a cab, and when she was on her feet for more than two to three hours or with quick changes in direction. She also had pain while lying on her back, when bringing her left knee toward the opposite shoulder (with her foot positioned outward, which is an internal rotation of the hip).

TREATMENT WITH PT AND CST
Tracy says, “In a typical PT session, I would have focused on strengthening and stretching both of her legs, emphasizing her left hip, along with some manual therapy. However, after guiding her through basic stretches and functional strengthening exercises that she could do at home, I primarily treated her with Craniosacral Therapy with intermittent therapeutic dialoguing. She opened up about a lot of stressful situations, both work-related and personal. Her left hip pain diminished over the course of weekly or bi-monthly sessions over a span of twelve to fourteen weeks. The pain subsided altogether when we discussed her relationship with her mother, which we discovered was a primary source of stress in her body. Although she was a stoic woman, she released some emotions (e.g. teary eyes) while speaking about her mother. Her craniosacral rhythm stopped during this outward expression of emotion, indicating that a source of health-related issues was surfacing from her unconscious to her conscious mind.

Although she was pain-free for the last few weeks I saw her, she requested to continue CST “just in case the pain was to came back.” Recently, I spoke with her and she stated that she has had only a “slight twinge,” but is pain-free as far as she’s concerned.”

70-YEAR OLD FEMALE WITH NECK PAIN/STIFFNESS
PRESENTING ISSUES
“The patient did not tolerate stretching or soft tissue massage of her neck by another physical therapist using “conventional PT treatment,” since it was “too painful,” and caused her to be even more “tense.” Given that the patient was consistently teary-eyed and reported that stress was causing stiffness in her neck, she was referred to me by my colleague, who thought she required a “gentler and sensitive” approach.”

TREATMENT WITH CST
“The patient enjoyed a combination of light touch and therapeutic dialoguing. She felt more “relaxed,” with less pain after the sessions, and her range of motion, along with the soft tissue tightness in her neck, improved. I was consistently drawn to the tissues around her upper left thorax region, just below her collar bone. Over time she revealed that her husband was sick and now in a wheelchair. While her husband had a home health aide five days a week, for four to six hours, the patient was very attentive to his needs. Steering his wheel chair created a lot of strain on the weak muscles in her arms and neck. The patient talked about feeling insignificant in her marriage. Her husband frequently yelled at her and had numerous affairs early in their marriage. Given his lack of respect, she felt guilty and sad in anticipating the relief and freedom she might feel when he died. She realized that she had neglected herself, sacrificing her own needs to accommodate those of her children and husband. Ultimately, she failed to recognize her own self-worth.

In one session, she pictured her chest as a black, heavy object that was “pushing her down,” preventing her from moving. Through therapeutic dialoguing and imagery that elicited feelings of contentment, she felt lighter and freer in her chest, and began to feel the spark of a yearning to “live her life.” She envisioned attending church on a regular basis and joining the choir, which had not been possible given her care-giving responsibilities and guilt. As she spoke about her “happy place,” my hands were drawn to her heart, and the patient expressed that the “heaviness” was releasing. She eventually established a positive and confident view of herself, committing to doing something that made her happy at least once a day without guilt, while her husband was in the care of the home health aide. As her self-assurance strengthened, the patient’s neck muscles became softer, with less to no report of stiffness.”

65-YEAR OLD FEMALE WITH A DIAGNOSIS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
PRESENTING ISSUES
The patient was referred to PT due to increasing leg spasms that disturbed her balance and gait. She had chronic, intermittent back pain, constant bilateral knee pain from arthritis, and headaches. She walked with a cane, with a slow gait and small uneven steps due to the pain in her knees, and expressed a strong fear of falling.

TREATMENT WITH PT AND CST
I initially treated her with “conventional” PT, focusing on balance and gait activities, gentle stretching of her legs, functional strengthening with energy conservation techniques, and instruction on home exercises. In one session, the patient shared that she didn’t do most of the home exercises so that she could conserve her energy for doctor’s appointments. She reported an increase in leg spasms that “threw her balance off” and an even greater fear of falling. As she described that her left leg, from her hip down to her knee, was in spasm, I noticed that she was walking much more slowly and carefully than usual. Inviting her to lay down on the mat and relax, I tuned into her craniosacral rhythm, noticing that it was “sluggish,” especially on her left side, below her rib cage.

After performing gentle hands-on techniques at her left hip and thigh, pelvic region, the full length of her spine (the dura mater, which is the membrane that surrounds the brain and spinal cord), her craniosacral rhythm improved in its rate and was more symmetrical with the left and right side. The patient noted that my hands felt very warm, and her tissues and some parts of her body were more “relaxed.” After the session, she stated that her left leg spasms had decreased considerably. When she stood up to walk, she reported being much “steadier.” As she departed, I observed that she was walking a little faster with more confidence, and a smile.

Depending on her fatigue level, the degree of pain in her knees, and left leg spasms, I continued to treat this patient with CST (versus conventional PT) for about 80% of our sessions for another seven to eight weeks, twice a week. After each CST session, the patient left with diminished pain and spasms, improved vitality in her craniosacral rhythm, and consequently, more energy. As a result of decreased pain and leg spasms, her balance and gait felt more “grounded.” During her last session she reported having “more good days than bad days” as a result of more developed mind/body awareness.”

Tracy shared that while patients with particularly complex health issues such as MS and chronic pain would benefit from further treatment, many are unable to continue their sessions for financial reasons. She notes however, that patients generally emerge from the course of treatment with tools and insights that result in much improved self-care.

HOW YOU CAN FIND A CRANIOSACRAL THERAPIST
Tracy suggests the Upledger Institute website (www.upledger.com) as a referral source for CST practitioners, in addition to “word-of-mouth” recommendations from trusted healthcare providers.

In assessing whether or not a particular Craniosacral Therapist is a good fit for you, she advises: “Find out if a practitioner is certified, or how many courses he/she has taken, in addition to the number of years the therapist has been in practice. Ask if the practitioner is comfortable with treating your condition, and if he/she has treated similar issues. Many highly skilled Craniosacral Therapists are not certified but have substantial experience and training in CST. Without seeking perfection, trust whether or not you feel comfortable with the CST practitioner during the initial visit or treatment. A good CST therapist will assess whether or not he/she is best suited to treat you and may refer you colleagues who might better assist you.”

Learn more about the benefits of CST by listening to my conversation with Tracy

Tracy invites you to contact her at www.iahp.com/Tracy-Lin to discuss your questions about CST, and explore your interest in experiencing this “light touch” therapeutic technique firsthand.

Loneliness Kills

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Loneliness Kills

AprilJFord PurpleProfile

Loneliness Expert and Best-Selling Author April J. Ford is the host of “You Are Not Alone” on VoiceAmerica Empowerment.

She will be a guest on the Gary Sheler program with the Tri-State’s All Talk Network. KAAA 1230 am in the greater Kingman area is networked with  KZZZ 1490 am in the Laughlin/Bullhead City area to bring the Tri-State  news/talk stations in the area.

Cheer Up The Lonely Day is a good way to reach out to someone that is lonely. According to a recent article in the NY Times, 1 in 3 Americans are chronically lonely.

Find out the secrets of how April was able to experience a lot of trauma in her life then turn it around with a positive message and to impact and empower others to do the same.

Healing Communities, Healing Ourselves

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7th Wave
Healing Communities, Healing Ourselves

 

dr-lori-leyden

How did the Merlin Arthur Legacy begin? It began with the story of ‘Merlin and the Faerie Queen’ which Maria Danly will share with her listeners today.  Our guest this week is the heroic Dr. Lori Leyden, a stress and trauma healing expert and certified master trainer, internationally known for using EFT/Tapping in her work with hundreds of orphan genocide survivors in Rwanda and her two years of work spent in Sandy Hook, supporting those traumatized by the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy in Newtown, CT.  In our Brain Tip segment today, Lori will teach us the basics of EFT and show us how to heal stress in ourselves in just a few moments of time.  Come and join us for a new episode of Legendary Leaders: Answering the Higher Calling which airs every Tuesday at 1pm Pacific Time. Welcome all!

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